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Patients and Families

We have a variety of knowledge translation tools for parents and caregivers on common childhood conditions. These tools are designed to provide evidence-based health information to parents and families to help them care for their sick children at home, and to aid them in understanding when to seek emergency department care. We work hard to engage health care providers, parents and caregivers throughout our tool development process. 

The information provided on TREKK.ca is designed to complement, not replace, the relationship between a patient and their own physician or healthcare provider.

Useful Websites

To help parents interact constructively with their children during this time of confinement, the World Health Organization created these six one-page tips for parents cover planning one-on-one time, staying positive, creating a daily routine, avoiding bad behaviour, managing stress, and talking about COVID-19.     




We’ve been hearing a lot about social distancing during the coronavirus outbreak. Now everyone is talking about physical distancing. So, what’s the difference? They basically mean the same thing, but as the coronavirus spreads and infects more people, the restrictions are getting more serious. And we’re being encouraged to find ways to be social, while still staying apart from each other — far apart. For example, you now need to stay two metres away from other people instead of just one. Check out this video to hear the latest.




Children and youth who have an anxiety disorder may find the information about COVID-19 in the news and around them especially worrisome. It would be most beneficial for them if information is presented in a calm, structured and realistic manner.  With that in mind, for many children the most reassuring way to manage this information is in conversation and relationship with parent(s)/caregiver(s). Click photo to learn more.




COVID-19 is creating anxiety for many, children included. Dr. Leslie Roos, a clinical scientist at the Children's Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba, shares how parents can help children remain calm during this time of uncertainty. 




The Emergency Department (ED) is a place where people go for immediate care. Visiting the ED can be scary and overwhelming, especially when you don’t know what to expect. Some hospital procedures have changed due to COVID-19, and we have added specific information related to the COVID-19 pandemic. We hope this infographic helps reduce stress and helps you prepare. This infographic was created through a collaboration between ECHO Research (University of Alberta), ARCHE (University of Alberta), and TREKK. Funding was provided by the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation through the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute. 




Information on COVID-19 from Caring for Kids for parents and families. 




Welcome to the HEAL (Health Education and Learning) program, a resource aimed at providing families across Alberta easily accessible, reliable information about common minor illness and injuries in children. The content provided in the HEAL program comes directly from the Pediatric Emergency Medicine experts at the Alberta Children’s Hospital and Stollery Children’s Hospital. While children with coughs, fever, ear pain, vomiting, diarrhea, minor head injuries or nosebleeds can feel very uncomfortable, they are most often safely and best cared for in their own home; the majority of these illnesses and injuries do not require a visit to the Emergency Department.




Caring for kids provides parents with information about their child and teen's health and well-being. The site is developed by the Canadian Pediatric Society.




Parachute is a Canadian, charitable organization dedicated to preventing injuries and saving lives. Their focus is on prevention, specifically related to motor vehicle collisions, sports and recreation and seniors' falls.




Associated with the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, this site provides parents, children and first-tier healthcare providers with free, evidence-based information about every day health and complex medical conditions.




Prepared by the Pediatric Section of the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians (CAEP) and the National Emergency Nurses Association (NENA), this resource highlights 10 tips to keep families safe and prepared for an emergency.




To help parents interact constructively with their children during this time of confinement, the World Health Organization created these six one-page tips for parents cover planning one-on-one time, staying positive, creating a daily routine, avoiding bad behaviour, managing stress, and talking about COVID-19.     




We’ve been hearing a lot about social distancing during the coronavirus outbreak. Now everyone is talking about physical distancing. So, what’s the difference? They basically mean the same thing, but as the coronavirus spreads and infects more people, the restrictions are getting more serious. And we’re being encouraged to find ways to be social, while still staying apart from each other — far apart. For example, you now need to stay two metres away from other people instead of just one. Check out this video to hear the latest.




Children and youth who have an anxiety disorder may find the information about COVID-19 in the news and around them especially worrisome. It would be most beneficial for them if information is presented in a calm, structured and realistic manner.  With that in mind, for many children the most reassuring way to manage this information is in conversation and relationship with parent(s)/caregiver(s). Click photo to learn more.




COVID-19 is creating anxiety for many, children included. Dr. Leslie Roos, a clinical scientist at the Children's Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba, shares how parents can help children remain calm during this time of uncertainty. 




The Emergency Department (ED) is a place where people go for immediate care. Visiting the ED can be scary and overwhelming, especially when you don’t know what to expect. Some hospital procedures have changed due to COVID-19, and we have added specific information related to the COVID-19 pandemic. We hope this infographic helps reduce stress and helps you prepare. This infographic was created through a collaboration between ECHO Research (University of Alberta), ARCHE (University of Alberta), and TREKK. Funding was provided by the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation through the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute. 




Information on COVID-19 from Caring for Kids for parents and families. 




Welcome to the HEAL (Health Education and Learning) program, a resource aimed at providing families across Alberta easily accessible, reliable information about common minor illness and injuries in children. The content provided in the HEAL program comes directly from the Pediatric Emergency Medicine experts at the Alberta Children’s Hospital and Stollery Children’s Hospital. While children with coughs, fever, ear pain, vomiting, diarrhea, minor head injuries or nosebleeds can feel very uncomfortable, they are most often safely and best cared for in their own home; the majority of these illnesses and injuries do not require a visit to the Emergency Department.




Caring for kids provides parents with information about their child and teen's health and well-being. The site is developed by the Canadian Pediatric Society.




Parachute is a Canadian, charitable organization dedicated to preventing injuries and saving lives. Their focus is on prevention, specifically related to motor vehicle collisions, sports and recreation and seniors' falls.




Associated with the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, this site provides parents, children and first-tier healthcare providers with free, evidence-based information about every day health and complex medical conditions.




Prepared by the Pediatric Section of the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians (CAEP) and the National Emergency Nurses Association (NENA), this resource highlights 10 tips to keep families safe and prepared for an emergency.