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Systematic reviews English (15) French All (15)

Systematic Review: Psychometric properties of the numerical rating scale to assess self-reported pain intensity in children and adolescents: A systematic review

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Castarlenas E, Jensen MP, von Baeyer CL, Miró J.

Objective: The Numerical Rating Scale-11 (NRS-11) is one of the most widely used scales to assess self-reported pain intensity in children, despite the limited information on its psychometric properties for assessing pain in pediatric populations. Recently, there has been an increase in published findings regarding the strengths and weaknesses of the NRS-11 as a measure of pain in youths. The purpose of this study was to review this research and summarize what is known regarding the reliability and validity of the NRS-11 as a self-report measure of pediatric pain intensity.

Cochrane Systematic Review: Intranasal fentanyl for the management of acute pain in children

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Murphy A, O'Sullivan R, Wakai A, Grant TS, Barrett MJ, Cronin J, McCoy SC, Ho...

Objective: We identified and evaluated all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-randomized trials to assess the effects of intranasal fentanyl (INF) versus alternative analgesic interventions in children with acute pain, with respect to reduction in pain score, occurrence of adverse events, patient tolerability, use of "rescue analgesia," patient/parental satisfaction and patient mortality.

Systematic Review: Opioid analgesia for acute abdominal pain in children: A systematic review and meta-analysis

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Poonai N, Paskar D, Konrad SL, Rieder M, Joubert G, Lim R, Golozar A, Uledi S...

Objectives: There are long-held concerns that analgesia in patients with acute abdominal pain may obscure the physical examination and lead to missing a diagnosis of appendicitis. Despite evidence to the contrary, analgesia continues to be underutilized and suboptimally dosed in children with acute abdominal pain. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to determine if opioids provide analgesia without an increase in side effects and appendicitis-related complications.

Cochrane Systematic Review: Nerve blocks for initial pain management of femoral fractures in children

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Black KJ, Bevan CA, Murphy NG, Howard JJ

Objectives: To assess the effects (benefits and harms) of femoral nerve block (FNB) or fascia iliaca compartment block (FICB) for initial pain management of children with fractures of the femur (thigh bone) in the pre-hospital or in-hospital emergency setting, with or without systemic analgesia.

Other Review: Treating abdominal pain in children: what do we know?

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Ali S, Sli H

Abdominal pain is a common reason for emergency department visits in the United States. Failure to treat children's pain has long been considered substandard and unethical. Within the emergency department setting, pain has been repeatedly shown to be undertreated. Analgesic medications are suboptimally used for children with abdominal pain because of a wide variety of causes. To our knowledge, there is no standard of care for the treatment of such pain. As such, several recent studies have set out to determine the most appropriate methods to address this gap in knowledge. The proceeding article will attempt to review the literature as it pertains to severe acute abdominal pain, biliary colic, renal colic, and dysmenorrhea.

Systematic Review: A systematic review of faces scales for the self-report of pain intensity in children

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Tomlinson D, von Baeyer CL, Stinson JN, Sung L

Objectives: To summarize and systematically review faces pain scales most commonly used to obtain self-report of pain intensity in children for evaluation of reliability and validity and to compare the scales for preference and utility.

Systematic Review: Pain management and sedation for children in the emergency department

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Atkinson P, Chesters A, Heinz P

We provide an overview of published evidence to help clinicians assess, manage, and minimise pain in children presenting to hospital.

Systematic Review: Treatment of children with migraine in the emergency department: a qualitative systematic review

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Bailey B, McManus BC

Objective: To evaluate which treatment could be effective in the emergency department (ED) for children with migraine and status migrainosus, we carried out a qualitative systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated treatment that could be used for those conditions.

Other Review: Does analgesia mask diagnosis of appendicitis among children?

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Bromberg R, Goldman RD

Question: Can analgesia be given safely to patients with suspected appendicitis prior to surgical evaluation without masking physical signs and symptoms?

Systematic Review: Systematic review of observational (behavioral) measures of pain for children and adolescents aged 3 to 18 years

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von Baeyer CL, Spagrud LJ

Observational (behavioral) scales of pain for children aged 3 to 18 years were systematically reviewed to identify those recommended as outcome measures in clinical trials.

Cochrane Systematic Review: Topical analgesia for acute otitis media

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Foxlee R, Johansson A, Wejfalk J, Dawkins J, Dooley L, Del Mar C

Objectives: To assess the effectiveness of topical analgesia for AOM.

Systematic Review: Systematic review of the psychometric properties, interpretability and feasibility of self-report pain intensity measures for use in clinical trials in children and adolescents

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Stinson JN, Kavanagh T, Yamada J, Gill N, Stevens B

The aim of this study was to systematically review the psychometric properties, interpretability and feasibility of self-report pain intensity measures for children and adolescents for use in clinical trials evaluating pain treatments.

Other Review: Pediatric pain management in the emergency department

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Bauman BH, McManus JG

In this article, the authors review the history of ED pediatric pain management and sedation, discuss special considerations in pediatric pain assessment and management, review various pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic methods of alleviating pain and anxiety, and present ideas to improve the culture of the pediatric ED, so that it can achieve the goal of becoming pain-free.

Sytematic Review: Symptomatic treatment of migraine in children: a systematic review of medication trials

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Damen L, Bruijn JK, Verhagen AP, Berger MY, Passchier J, Koes BW

Objective: Treatment of pediatric migraine includes an individually tailored regimen of both nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic measures. The mainstay of symptomatic treatment in children with migraine is intermittent oral or suppository analgesics, but there is no coherent body of evidence on symptomatic treatment of childhood migraine available. The objective of this review is to describe and assess the evidence from randomized and clinical controlled trials concerning the efficacy and tolerability of symptomatic treatment of migraine in children.

Other Review: Analgesics for the treatment of pain in children

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Berde CB, Sethna NF

Studies over the past 15 years suggest that neonates, infants, and children can receive analgesia and anesthesia safely, with proper age-related adjustments in clinical practice and dosing. Although the emphasis in this review is on the pharmacologic management of pain, several nonpharmacologic approaches, including hypnosis and related cognitive behavioral approaches, have had good efficacy in children with acute or chronic pain.5,6 Making the hospital environment a less terrifying place may reduce anxiety and fear, which can themselves exacerbate pain.7 Conversely, nonpharmacologic approaches should not be used as an excuse to withhold appropriate analgesics.

Systematic Review: Psychometric properties of the numerical rating scale to assess self-reported pain intensity in children and adolescents: A systematic review

Visit

Castarlenas E, Jensen MP, von Baeyer CL, Miró J.

Objective: The Numerical Rating Scale-11 (NRS-11) is one of the most widely used scales to assess self-reported pain intensity in children, despite the limited information on its psychometric properties for assessing pain in pediatric populations. Recently, there has been an increase in published findings regarding the strengths and weaknesses of the NRS-11 as a measure of pain in youths. The purpose of this study was to review this research and summarize what is known regarding the reliability and validity of the NRS-11 as a self-report measure of pediatric pain intensity.

Cochrane Systematic Review: Intranasal fentanyl for the management of acute pain in children

Visit

Murphy A, O'Sullivan R, Wakai A, Grant TS, Barrett MJ, Cronin J, McCoy SC, Ho...

Objective: We identified and evaluated all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-randomized trials to assess the effects of intranasal fentanyl (INF) versus alternative analgesic interventions in children with acute pain, with respect to reduction in pain score, occurrence of adverse events, patient tolerability, use of "rescue analgesia," patient/parental satisfaction and patient mortality.

Systematic Review: Opioid analgesia for acute abdominal pain in children: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Visit

Poonai N, Paskar D, Konrad SL, Rieder M, Joubert G, Lim R, Golozar A, Uledi S...

Objectives: There are long-held concerns that analgesia in patients with acute abdominal pain may obscure the physical examination and lead to missing a diagnosis of appendicitis. Despite evidence to the contrary, analgesia continues to be underutilized and suboptimally dosed in children with acute abdominal pain. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to determine if opioids provide analgesia without an increase in side effects and appendicitis-related complications.

Cochrane Systematic Review: Nerve blocks for initial pain management of femoral fractures in children

Visit

Black KJ, Bevan CA, Murphy NG, Howard JJ

Objectives: To assess the effects (benefits and harms) of femoral nerve block (FNB) or fascia iliaca compartment block (FICB) for initial pain management of children with fractures of the femur (thigh bone) in the pre-hospital or in-hospital emergency setting, with or without systemic analgesia.

Other Review: Treating abdominal pain in children: what do we know?

Visit

Ali S, Sli H

Abdominal pain is a common reason for emergency department visits in the United States. Failure to treat children's pain has long been considered substandard and unethical. Within the emergency department setting, pain has been repeatedly shown to be undertreated. Analgesic medications are suboptimally used for children with abdominal pain because of a wide variety of causes. To our knowledge, there is no standard of care for the treatment of such pain. As such, several recent studies have set out to determine the most appropriate methods to address this gap in knowledge. The proceeding article will attempt to review the literature as it pertains to severe acute abdominal pain, biliary colic, renal colic, and dysmenorrhea.

Systematic Review: A systematic review of faces scales for the self-report of pain intensity in children

Visit

Tomlinson D, von Baeyer CL, Stinson JN, Sung L

Objectives: To summarize and systematically review faces pain scales most commonly used to obtain self-report of pain intensity in children for evaluation of reliability and validity and to compare the scales for preference and utility.

Systematic Review: Pain management and sedation for children in the emergency department

Visit

Atkinson P, Chesters A, Heinz P

We provide an overview of published evidence to help clinicians assess, manage, and minimise pain in children presenting to hospital.

Systematic Review: Treatment of children with migraine in the emergency department: a qualitative systematic review

Visit

Bailey B, McManus BC

Objective: To evaluate which treatment could be effective in the emergency department (ED) for children with migraine and status migrainosus, we carried out a qualitative systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated treatment that could be used for those conditions.

Other Review: Does analgesia mask diagnosis of appendicitis among children?

Visit

Bromberg R, Goldman RD

Question: Can analgesia be given safely to patients with suspected appendicitis prior to surgical evaluation without masking physical signs and symptoms?

Systematic Review: Systematic review of observational (behavioral) measures of pain for children and adolescents aged 3 to 18 years

Visit

von Baeyer CL, Spagrud LJ

Observational (behavioral) scales of pain for children aged 3 to 18 years were systematically reviewed to identify those recommended as outcome measures in clinical trials.

Cochrane Systematic Review: Topical analgesia for acute otitis media

Visit

Foxlee R, Johansson A, Wejfalk J, Dawkins J, Dooley L, Del Mar C

Objectives: To assess the effectiveness of topical analgesia for AOM.

Systematic Review: Systematic review of the psychometric properties, interpretability and feasibility of self-report pain intensity measures for use in clinical trials in children and adolescents

Visit

Stinson JN, Kavanagh T, Yamada J, Gill N, Stevens B

The aim of this study was to systematically review the psychometric properties, interpretability and feasibility of self-report pain intensity measures for children and adolescents for use in clinical trials evaluating pain treatments.

Other Review: Pediatric pain management in the emergency department

Visit

Bauman BH, McManus JG

In this article, the authors review the history of ED pediatric pain management and sedation, discuss special considerations in pediatric pain assessment and management, review various pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic methods of alleviating pain and anxiety, and present ideas to improve the culture of the pediatric ED, so that it can achieve the goal of becoming pain-free.

Sytematic Review: Symptomatic treatment of migraine in children: a systematic review of medication trials

Visit

Damen L, Bruijn JK, Verhagen AP, Berger MY, Passchier J, Koes BW

Objective: Treatment of pediatric migraine includes an individually tailored regimen of both nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic measures. The mainstay of symptomatic treatment in children with migraine is intermittent oral or suppository analgesics, but there is no coherent body of evidence on symptomatic treatment of childhood migraine available. The objective of this review is to describe and assess the evidence from randomized and clinical controlled trials concerning the efficacy and tolerability of symptomatic treatment of migraine in children.

Other Review: Analgesics for the treatment of pain in children

Visit

Berde CB, Sethna NF

Studies over the past 15 years suggest that neonates, infants, and children can receive analgesia and anesthesia safely, with proper age-related adjustments in clinical practice and dosing. Although the emphasis in this review is on the pharmacologic management of pain, several nonpharmacologic approaches, including hypnosis and related cognitive behavioral approaches, have had good efficacy in children with acute or chronic pain.5,6 Making the hospital environment a less terrifying place may reduce anxiety and fear, which can themselves exacerbate pain.7 Conversely, nonpharmacologic approaches should not be used as an excuse to withhold appropriate analgesics.