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Gastroenteritis is a common disease, usually of viral origin that inflames both the stomach and small intestine. It is characterized by fever, diarrhea and vomiting.

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Summaries of systematic reviews English (6) French All (6)

TREKK Talk: Gastroenteritis (2014)

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Freedman, S

This TREKK Talk features Dr. Stephen Freedman (TREKK Content Advisor for Gastroenteritis, Physician & Associate Professor in the Department of Paediatrics, Sections of Emergency Medicine and Gastroenterology, University of Calgary) as he discusses the evidence, treatment and management of pediatric gastroenteritis in the emergency department. Presented at the 2014 Annual Pediatric Emergency Medicine Assembly, Health Sciences Centre Children's Hospital, Winnipeg, MB. 9/15/2014

Cochrane Summary: The use of probiotics to prevent Clostridium difficile diarrhea associated with antibiotic use

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Goldenberg JZ, Yap C, Lytvyn L, Lo CK, Beardsley J, Mertz D, Johnston BC

Summarizes research to determine if probiotics prevent Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea in adults and children receiving antibiotic therapy, and whether probiotics cause any harms.

Evidence Summary: Gastroenteritis

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Alberta Research Centre for Health Evidence (ARCHE)

The purpose of this document is to describe the effectiveness of three treatment options for pediatric gastroenteritis, based on a 2013 overview of reviews by Freedman SB et al.

Cochrane Overview: Treatment of acute gastroenteritis in children: an overview of systematic reviews of interventions commonly used in developed countries

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Freedman SB, Ali S, Oleszczuk M, Gouin S, Hartling L

The purpose of this overview is to critically evaluate the evidence currently available in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews regarding the efficacy and safety of commonly considered treatment options in children with acute gastroenteritis.

Cochrane Summary: Anti-sickness medication for vomiting in acute stomach upsets in children

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Fedorowicz Z, Jagannath VA, Carter B

Vomiting caused byacutegastroenteritis is very common in children and adolescents. Treatment of vomiting in children withacutegastroenteritis can be problematic and there is lack of agreement among clinicians on the indications for the use of antiemetics. There have also been concerns expressed about apparently unacceptable levels of side effects with some of the older generation of antiemetics. The small number of included trials provided evidence which appeared to favour the use of antiemetics overplaceboto reduce the number of episodes of vomiting due to gastroenteritis in children. A singleoraldose of ondansetron given to children with mild to moderate dehydration cancontrolvomiting, avoid hospitalization andintravenousfluid administration which would otherwise be needed. There were no major side effects other than a few reports of increased frequency of diarrhea.

Cochrane Summary: Children with dehydration due to gastroenteritis need to be rehydrated, and this review did not show any important differences between giving fluids orally or intravenously

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Hartling L, Bellemare S, Wiebe N, Russell KF, Klassen TP, Craig WR

Dehydration is when body water content is reduced causing dry skin, headaches, sunken eyes, dizziness, confusion, and sometimes death. Children with dehydration due to gastroenteritis need rehydrating either by liquids given by mouth or a tube through the nose, or intravenously. Thereviewof 17 trials (some funded by drug companies) found that the trials were not of high quality; however the evidence suggested that there are no clinically important differences between giving fluids orally or intravenously. For every 25 children treated with fluids given orally, one child would fail and requireintravenousrehydration. Further, the results for low osmolarity solutions, the currently recommended treatment by the World Health Organization, showed a lower failure rate fororalrehydration that was not significantly different from that ofintravenousrehydration. Oral rehydration should be the first line of treatment in children with mild to moderate dehydration withintravenoustherapybeing used if theoralroute fails. The evidence showed that there may be a higherriskof paralytic ileus withoralrehydration whileintravenoustherapycarries theriskofphlebitis(ie inflammation of the veins).

TREKK Talk: Gastroenteritis (2014)

Visit

Freedman, S

This TREKK Talk features Dr. Stephen Freedman (TREKK Content Advisor for Gastroenteritis, Physician & Associate Professor in the Department of Paediatrics, Sections of Emergency Medicine and Gastroenterology, University of Calgary) as he discusses the evidence, treatment and management of pediatric gastroenteritis in the emergency department. Presented at the 2014 Annual Pediatric Emergency Medicine Assembly, Health Sciences Centre Children's Hospital, Winnipeg, MB. 9/15/2014

Cochrane Summary: The use of probiotics to prevent Clostridium difficile diarrhea associated with antibiotic use

Visit

Goldenberg JZ, Yap C, Lytvyn L, Lo CK, Beardsley J, Mertz D, Johnston BC

Summarizes research to determine if probiotics prevent Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea in adults and children receiving antibiotic therapy, and whether probiotics cause any harms.

Evidence Summary: Gastroenteritis

Download

Alberta Research Centre for Health Evidence (ARCHE)

The purpose of this document is to describe the effectiveness of three treatment options for pediatric gastroenteritis, based on a 2013 overview of reviews by Freedman SB et al.

Cochrane Overview: Treatment of acute gastroenteritis in children: an overview of systematic reviews of interventions commonly used in developed countries

Visit

Freedman SB, Ali S, Oleszczuk M, Gouin S, Hartling L

The purpose of this overview is to critically evaluate the evidence currently available in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews regarding the efficacy and safety of commonly considered treatment options in children with acute gastroenteritis.

Cochrane Summary: Anti-sickness medication for vomiting in acute stomach upsets in children

Visit

Fedorowicz Z, Jagannath VA, Carter B

Vomiting caused byacutegastroenteritis is very common in children and adolescents. Treatment of vomiting in children withacutegastroenteritis can be problematic and there is lack of agreement among clinicians on the indications for the use of antiemetics. There have also been concerns expressed about apparently unacceptable levels of side effects with some of the older generation of antiemetics. The small number of included trials provided evidence which appeared to favour the use of antiemetics overplaceboto reduce the number of episodes of vomiting due to gastroenteritis in children. A singleoraldose of ondansetron given to children with mild to moderate dehydration cancontrolvomiting, avoid hospitalization andintravenousfluid administration which would otherwise be needed. There were no major side effects other than a few reports of increased frequency of diarrhea.

Cochrane Summary: Children with dehydration due to gastroenteritis need to be rehydrated, and this review did not show any important differences between giving fluids orally or intravenously

Visit

Hartling L, Bellemare S, Wiebe N, Russell KF, Klassen TP, Craig WR

Dehydration is when body water content is reduced causing dry skin, headaches, sunken eyes, dizziness, confusion, and sometimes death. Children with dehydration due to gastroenteritis need rehydrating either by liquids given by mouth or a tube through the nose, or intravenously. Thereviewof 17 trials (some funded by drug companies) found that the trials were not of high quality; however the evidence suggested that there are no clinically important differences between giving fluids orally or intravenously. For every 25 children treated with fluids given orally, one child would fail and requireintravenousrehydration. Further, the results for low osmolarity solutions, the currently recommended treatment by the World Health Organization, showed a lower failure rate fororalrehydration that was not significantly different from that ofintravenousrehydration. Oral rehydration should be the first line of treatment in children with mild to moderate dehydration withintravenoustherapybeing used if theoralroute fails. The evidence showed that there may be a higherriskof paralytic ileus withoralrehydration whileintravenoustherapycarries theriskofphlebitis(ie inflammation of the veins).

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