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All overviews or summaries of systematic reviews

BROWSE INFORMATION REPOSITORY
Acute Otitis Media English (5) French All (5)

Cochrane Summary: Systemic corticosteroids for improving symptoms in children with acute middle ear infection  (2018)

Cochrane Summary: Systemic corticosteroids for improving symptoms in children with acute middle ear infection

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Ranakusuma RW, Pitoyo Y, Safitri ED, Thorning S, Beller EM, Sastroasmoro S, Del Mar CB

Ranakusuma RW, Pitoyo Y, Safitri ED, Thorning S, Beller EM, Sastroasmoro S, D...

Objective: To assess the effects of systemic corticosteroids (oral or parenteral), with or without antibiotics, for AOM in children.

Cochrane Summary: Influenza vaccine for preventing acute otitis media (middle ear infection)  (2017)

Cochrane Summary: Influenza vaccine for preventing acute otitis media (middle ear infection)

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Norhayati MN, Ho JJ, Azman MY

Norhayati MN, Ho JJ, Azman MY

Objective: To assess the effectiveness of influenza vaccine in reducing the occurrence of acute otitis media in infants and children.

Evidence Summary: Are topical antibiotics an alternative to oral antibiotics for children with acute otitis media and ear discharge?  (2016)

Evidence Summary: Are topical antibiotics an alternative to oral antibiotics for children with acute otitis media and ear discharge?

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Venekamp RP, Prasad V, Hay AD

Venekamp RP, Prasad V, Hay AD

Objective: To review the evidence comparing efectiveness of topical antibiotics with oral antibiotics, placebo, or no treatment in children with AOM presenting with ear discharge caused by spontaneous perforation of the eardrum.

Cochrane Summary: Pain relievers for children with acute middle ear infection  (2016)

Cochrane Summary: Pain relievers for children with acute middle ear infection

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Sjoukes A, Venekamp RP, van de Pol AC, Hay AD, Little P, Schilder AG, Damoiseaux RA

Sjoukes A, Venekamp RP, van de Pol AC, Hay AD, Little P, Schilder AG, Damoise...

Objective: Our primary objective was to assess the effectiveness of paracetamol (acetaminophen) or NSAIDs, alone or combined, compared with placebo or no treatment in relieving pain in children with AOM. Our secondary objective was to assess the effectiveness of NSAIDs compared with paracetamol in children with AOM.

Cochrane Summary: Antibiotics for otitis media with effusion ('glue ear') in children  (2016)

Cochrane Summary: Antibiotics for otitis media with effusion ('glue ear') in children

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Venekamp RP, Burton MJ, van Dongen TM, van der Heijden GJ, van Zon A, Schilder AG

Venekamp RP, Burton MJ, van Dongen TM, van der Heijden GJ, van Zon A, Schilde...

Objective: To assess the benefits and harms of oral antibiotics in children up to 18 years with OME.

Cochrane Summary: Systemic corticosteroids for improving symptoms in children with acute middle ear infection  (2018)

Cochrane Summary: Systemic corticosteroids for improving symptoms in children with acute middle ear infection

Visit

Ranakusuma RW, Pitoyo Y, Safitri ED, Thorning S, Beller EM, Sastroasmoro S, Del Mar CB

Ranakusuma RW, Pitoyo Y, Safitri ED, Thorning S, Beller EM, Sastroasmoro S, D...

Objective: To assess the effects of systemic corticosteroids (oral or parenteral), with or without antibiotics, for AOM in children.

Cochrane Summary: Influenza vaccine for preventing acute otitis media (middle ear infection)  (2017)

Cochrane Summary: Influenza vaccine for preventing acute otitis media (middle ear infection)

Visit

Norhayati MN, Ho JJ, Azman MY

Norhayati MN, Ho JJ, Azman MY

Objective: To assess the effectiveness of influenza vaccine in reducing the occurrence of acute otitis media in infants and children.

Evidence Summary: Are topical antibiotics an alternative to oral antibiotics for children with acute otitis media and ear discharge?  (2016)

Evidence Summary: Are topical antibiotics an alternative to oral antibiotics for children with acute otitis media and ear discharge?

Visit

Venekamp RP, Prasad V, Hay AD

Venekamp RP, Prasad V, Hay AD

Objective: To review the evidence comparing efectiveness of topical antibiotics with oral antibiotics, placebo, or no treatment in children with AOM presenting with ear discharge caused by spontaneous perforation of the eardrum.

Cochrane Summary: Pain relievers for children with acute middle ear infection  (2016)

Cochrane Summary: Pain relievers for children with acute middle ear infection

Visit

Sjoukes A, Venekamp RP, van de Pol AC, Hay AD, Little P, Schilder AG, Damoiseaux RA

Sjoukes A, Venekamp RP, van de Pol AC, Hay AD, Little P, Schilder AG, Damoise...

Objective: Our primary objective was to assess the effectiveness of paracetamol (acetaminophen) or NSAIDs, alone or combined, compared with placebo or no treatment in relieving pain in children with AOM. Our secondary objective was to assess the effectiveness of NSAIDs compared with paracetamol in children with AOM.

Cochrane Summary: Antibiotics for otitis media with effusion ('glue ear') in children  (2016)

Cochrane Summary: Antibiotics for otitis media with effusion ('glue ear') in children

Visit

Venekamp RP, Burton MJ, van Dongen TM, van der Heijden GJ, van Zon A, Schilder AG

Venekamp RP, Burton MJ, van Dongen TM, van der Heijden GJ, van Zon A, Schilde...

Objective: To assess the benefits and harms of oral antibiotics in children up to 18 years with OME.

Anaphylaxis English (1) French All (1)

Cochrane Summary: Glucocorticoids for the treatment of anaphylaxis  (2012)

Cochrane Summary: Glucocorticoids for the treatment of anaphylaxis

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Choo K, Simons FR, Sheikh A

Choo K, Simons FR, Sheikh A

To overview literature of emergency treatment of anaphylaxis

Cochrane Summary: Glucocorticoids for the treatment of anaphylaxis  (2012)

Cochrane Summary: Glucocorticoids for the treatment of anaphylaxis

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Choo K, Simons FR, Sheikh A

Choo K, Simons FR, Sheikh A

To overview literature of emergency treatment of anaphylaxis

Asthma English (7) French All (7)

Cochrane Summary: Holding chambers (spacers) versus nebulisers for delivery of beta-agonist relievers in the treatment of an asthma attack (2013)

Cochrane Summary: Holding chambers (spacers) versus nebulisers for delivery of beta-agonist relievers in the treatment of an asthma attack (2013)

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Cates, CJ, Welsh, EJ, Rowe, BH,

Cates, CJ, Welsh, EJ, Rowe, BH,

Review question: When someone is having an asthma attack is it as safe and effective to use a spacer instead of a nebuliser? Background: During an asthma attack, the airways (tubes in the lungs) narrow making breathing difficult. The initial response to an asthma attack is to treat with a drug that can open up the airways and make breathing easier. These drugs are called bronchodilators and in this review we are looking specifically at a class of bronchodilators called beta-agonists (for example salbutamol). These drugs can be taken straight from an inhaler, but during an asthma attack they are easier to take using either a spacer or a nebuliser. A spacer is a hollow chamber. A puff of drug from an inhaler is added to the chamber and then the person breathes in and out normally (also described as tidal breathing), from a mouthpiece on the chamber. A nebuliser is a machine with a mask that goes over the person's mouth and nose and through which a constant stream of drug and air (or oxygen) is breathed in and out normally. What evidence did we find? We found 39 clinical trials involving 1897 children and 729 adults. Thirty-three of the trials were conducted in an emergency room (or emergency department) and community settings (such as a GP's surgery), and six trials were on inpatients (people in hospital) with acute asthma (207 children and 28 adults). Overall we judged the quality of the evidence to be moderate. What do the studies tell us? Taking beta-agonists through either a spacer or a nebuliser in the emergency department did not make a difference to the number of adults being admitted to hospital, whilst in children we can be fairly confident that nebulisers are not better than spacers at preventing admissions. In children, the length of stay in the emergency department was significantly shorter when the spacer was used instead of a nebuliser. The average stay in the emergency department for children given nebulised treatment was 103 minutes. Children given treatment via spacers spent an average of 33 minutes less. In adults, the length of stay in the emergency department was similar for the two delivery methods. However the adult studies were conducted slightly differently which may have made it more difficult to show a difference in the length of stay in the emergency department. Because all the adult studies used a so-called "double-dummy" design, the adults received a spacer AND a nebuliser (either beta-agonist in a spacer and a dummy nebuliser or vice versa) which meant both groups of people were in the emergency department for as long as it took to take both treatments. Lung function tests were also similar for the two delivery methods in both adults and children. Pulse rate was lower in children taking beta-agonists through a spacer (mean difference 5% baseline), and there was a lower risk of developing tremor. Conclusion: Metered-dose inhalers with a spacer can perform at least as well as wet nebulisation in delivering beta-agonists in children with acute asthma, but we are less certain about the results in adults.

Cochrane Summary: Combined inhaled anticholinergics and beta2-agonists for initial treatment of acute asthma in children (2013)

Cochrane Summary: Combined inhaled anticholinergics and beta2-agonists for initial treatment of acute asthma in children (2013)

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Griffiths, B, Ducharme, FM,

Griffiths, B, Ducharme, FM,

Background: In an asthma attack, the airways (small tubes in the lungs) narrow because of inflammation (swelling), muscle spasms and mucus secretions. Other symptoms include wheezing, coughing and chest tightness. This makes breathing difficult. Reliever inhalers typically contain short-acting beta2-agonists (SABAs) that relax the muscles in the airways, opening the airways so that breathing is easier. Anticholinergic drugs work by opening the airways and decreasing mucus secretions. Review question: We looked at randomised controlled trials to find out whether giving inhaled anticholinergics plus SABAs (instead of SABAs on their own) in the emergency department provides benefits or harms in children having an asthma attack. Key results: We found that children with a moderate or severe asthma attack who were given both drugs in the emergency department were less likely to be admitted to the hospital than those who only had SABAs. In the group receiving only SABAs, on average 23 out of 100 children with acute asthma were admitted to hospital compared with an average of 17 (95% CI 15 to 20) out of 100 children treated with SABAs plus anticholinergics. Taking both drugs was also better at improving lung function. Taking both drugs did not seem to reduce the possibility of another asthma attack. Fewer children treated with anticholinergics reported nausea and tremor, but no significant group difference was observed for vomiting. Quality of the evidence and further research: Most of the studies were in preschool- and school-aged children; three studies also included a small proportion of infants under 18 months of age, although there was no evidence that inclusion of these infants with wheezy episodes affected the results. Nine trials (45%) were at a low risk of bias and we regarded the evidence for hospitalisation as high quality. Physicians can administer the dose of anticholinergic and SABA in several different ways; as a single dose, or as a certain number of doses or more flexibly. Most of the trials gave the children two or three doses and we think that more research is needed to improve characterization of children that benefit from, and the most effective number and frequency of doses of, anticholinergic treatment.

Cochrane Summary: Inhaled corticosteroids for acute asthma following emergency department discharge (2012)

Cochrane Summary: Inhaled corticosteroids for acute asthma following emergency department discharge (2012)

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Edmonds, ML, Milan, SJ, Brenner, BE, Camargo, CA, Rowe, BH,

Edmonds, ML, Milan, SJ, Brenner, BE, Camargo, CA, Rowe, BH,

Acuteasthma is a common cause of visits toemergencydepartments (ED) and the majority of patients are treated and discharged home. Some people will have arelapseofacuteasthma within two weeks of being discharged after apparently successful treatment. Beta2-agonist drugs are used to open the muscles in the airways and corticosteroids drugs are used to reduce inflammation of the swollen airways.Corticosteroidscan be inhaled (ICS) or swallowed as a tablet (so-calledoralcorticosteroids). ICS may reduceadverse effectsand get to the airways more directly thanoralcorticosteroids. Thisreviewof trials found that there was insufficient evidence that inhaling corticosteroids as well as taking the drugs orally is better thanoraluse alone, afteremergencydepartment treatment for an asthma attack. There is also insufficient evidence that taking ICS alone is as good as taking them orally, although there is some evidence to support using ICS alone for mild asthma attacks afteremergencydepartment discharge. Moreresearchis needed.

Cochrane Summary: Role of ketamine for management of acute severe asthma in children (2012)

Cochrane Summary: Role of ketamine for management of acute severe asthma in children (2012)

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Jat, KR, Chawla, D,

Jat, KR, Chawla, D,

Children frequently visit theemergencydepartment foracuteexacerbation of asthma. Some of these children fail to respond tostandard treatment(corticosteroids and bronchodilators) with increasedmorbidity. Ketamine has bronchodilatory properties and may be useful foracuteexacerbation of asthma. We evaluated theefficacyof ketamine for management of severeacuteasthma in children who had not responded to standardtherapy. We found, through systematic search, only onestudywhere investigators assessed the usefulness of ketamine for management of severeacuteasthma in children. While this singlestudysuggested that there is a lack of evidence for usefulness of ketamine inacuteexacerbation of asthma in children, more trials are needed regarding the use of ketamine inacuteasthma before more specific recommendations can be made.

Cochrane Summary: What are the effects of educational interventions delivered to children and/or their families, who have experienced an emergency department visit with their asthma within the previous 12 months? (2010)

Cochrane Summary: What are the effects of educational interventions delivered to children and/or their families, who have experienced an emergency department visit with their asthma within the previous 12 months? (2010)

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Boyd, M, Lasserson, TJ, McKean, MC, Gibson, PG, Ducharme, FM, Haby, M,

Boyd, M, Lasserson, TJ, McKean, MC, Gibson, PG, Ducharme, FM, Haby, M,

Asthma care for children in our society is common and costly. There is now evidence that educationalinterventionfor children who have attended theemergencydepartment for asthma lowers theriskof the need for futureemergencydepartment visits and hospital admissions. Thisreviewlooked at studies which compared usual care for asthma to more intensive educational programmes and the results showed astatistically significantreduction in the treatment groups needing subsequentemergencydepartment visits or hospital admissions. We were not able to determine the most effective type, duration or intensity ofeducationthat should be offered to children to offer the best asthma outcomes.

Cochrane Summary: Magnesium sulfate for treating exacerbations of acute asthma in the emergency department (2009)

Cochrane Summary: Magnesium sulfate for treating exacerbations of acute asthma in the emergency department (2009)

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Rowe, BH, Bretzlaff, J, Bourdon, C, Bota, G, Blitz, S, Camargo, CA,

Rowe, BH, Bretzlaff, J, Bourdon, C, Bota, G, Blitz, S, Camargo, CA,

In an asthma attack, the airways (passages to the lungs) narrow from muscle spasms and swelling (inflammation). Bronchodilator drugs (reliever inhalers) can be used to relax the muscles and open the airways, and corticosteroid drugs to reduce the inflammation. Magnesium sulfate is a drug that can also affect muscles, and may reduce inflammation as well. It can be given through a drip in the veins (intravenously). Thereviewof trials found thatintravenousmagnesium sulfate in addition to bronchodilators seems to be safe and beneficial for people with severe asthma attacks, or those for whom bronchodilators are not working.

Cochrane Summary: Early emergency department treatment of acute asthma with systemic corticosteroids (2008)

Cochrane Summary: Early emergency department treatment of acute asthma with systemic corticosteroids (2008)

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Rowe, BH, Spooner, C, Ducharme, F, Bretzlaff, J, Bota, G,

Rowe, BH, Spooner, C, Ducharme, F, Bretzlaff, J, Bota, G,

In an asthma attack, the airways (passages to the lungs) narrow from muscle spasms and swelling (inflammation). Bronchodilators (reliever inhalers to open up the lungs and airways) can be used for the spasms, and corticosteroids for the swelling.Corticosteroidscan be inhaled, or taken by mouth (orally) or through a drip into the veins (intravenously). Thereviewof trials found thatsystemic(oralorintravenous) corticosteroids reduce the need for people with asthma attacks to stay in hospital, with fewadverse effects.

Cochrane Summary: Holding chambers (spacers) versus nebulisers for delivery of beta-agonist relievers in the treatment of an asthma attack (2013)

Cochrane Summary: Holding chambers (spacers) versus nebulisers for delivery of beta-agonist relievers in the treatment of an asthma attack (2013)

Visit

Cates, CJ, Welsh, EJ, Rowe, BH,

Cates, CJ, Welsh, EJ, Rowe, BH,

Review question: When someone is having an asthma attack is it as safe and effective to use a spacer instead of a nebuliser? Background: During an asthma attack, the airways (tubes in the lungs) narrow making breathing difficult. The initial response to an asthma attack is to treat with a drug that can open up the airways and make breathing easier. These drugs are called bronchodilators and in this review we are looking specifically at a class of bronchodilators called beta-agonists (for example salbutamol). These drugs can be taken straight from an inhaler, but during an asthma attack they are easier to take using either a spacer or a nebuliser. A spacer is a hollow chamber. A puff of drug from an inhaler is added to the chamber and then the person breathes in and out normally (also described as tidal breathing), from a mouthpiece on the chamber. A nebuliser is a machine with a mask that goes over the person's mouth and nose and through which a constant stream of drug and air (or oxygen) is breathed in and out normally. What evidence did we find? We found 39 clinical trials involving 1897 children and 729 adults. Thirty-three of the trials were conducted in an emergency room (or emergency department) and community settings (such as a GP's surgery), and six trials were on inpatients (people in hospital) with acute asthma (207 children and 28 adults). Overall we judged the quality of the evidence to be moderate. What do the studies tell us? Taking beta-agonists through either a spacer or a nebuliser in the emergency department did not make a difference to the number of adults being admitted to hospital, whilst in children we can be fairly confident that nebulisers are not better than spacers at preventing admissions. In children, the length of stay in the emergency department was significantly shorter when the spacer was used instead of a nebuliser. The average stay in the emergency department for children given nebulised treatment was 103 minutes. Children given treatment via spacers spent an average of 33 minutes less. In adults, the length of stay in the emergency department was similar for the two delivery methods. However the adult studies were conducted slightly differently which may have made it more difficult to show a difference in the length of stay in the emergency department. Because all the adult studies used a so-called "double-dummy" design, the adults received a spacer AND a nebuliser (either beta-agonist in a spacer and a dummy nebuliser or vice versa) which meant both groups of people were in the emergency department for as long as it took to take both treatments. Lung function tests were also similar for the two delivery methods in both adults and children. Pulse rate was lower in children taking beta-agonists through a spacer (mean difference 5% baseline), and there was a lower risk of developing tremor. Conclusion: Metered-dose inhalers with a spacer can perform at least as well as wet nebulisation in delivering beta-agonists in children with acute asthma, but we are less certain about the results in adults.

Cochrane Summary: Combined inhaled anticholinergics and beta2-agonists for initial treatment of acute asthma in children (2013)

Cochrane Summary: Combined inhaled anticholinergics and beta2-agonists for initial treatment of acute asthma in children (2013)

Visit

Griffiths, B, Ducharme, FM,

Griffiths, B, Ducharme, FM,

Background: In an asthma attack, the airways (small tubes in the lungs) narrow because of inflammation (swelling), muscle spasms and mucus secretions. Other symptoms include wheezing, coughing and chest tightness. This makes breathing difficult. Reliever inhalers typically contain short-acting beta2-agonists (SABAs) that relax the muscles in the airways, opening the airways so that breathing is easier. Anticholinergic drugs work by opening the airways and decreasing mucus secretions. Review question: We looked at randomised controlled trials to find out whether giving inhaled anticholinergics plus SABAs (instead of SABAs on their own) in the emergency department provides benefits or harms in children having an asthma attack. Key results: We found that children with a moderate or severe asthma attack who were given both drugs in the emergency department were less likely to be admitted to the hospital than those who only had SABAs. In the group receiving only SABAs, on average 23 out of 100 children with acute asthma were admitted to hospital compared with an average of 17 (95% CI 15 to 20) out of 100 children treated with SABAs plus anticholinergics. Taking both drugs was also better at improving lung function. Taking both drugs did not seem to reduce the possibility of another asthma attack. Fewer children treated with anticholinergics reported nausea and tremor, but no significant group difference was observed for vomiting. Quality of the evidence and further research: Most of the studies were in preschool- and school-aged children; three studies also included a small proportion of infants under 18 months of age, although there was no evidence that inclusion of these infants with wheezy episodes affected the results. Nine trials (45%) were at a low risk of bias and we regarded the evidence for hospitalisation as high quality. Physicians can administer the dose of anticholinergic and SABA in several different ways; as a single dose, or as a certain number of doses or more flexibly. Most of the trials gave the children two or three doses and we think that more research is needed to improve characterization of children that benefit from, and the most effective number and frequency of doses of, anticholinergic treatment.

Cochrane Summary: Inhaled corticosteroids for acute asthma following emergency department discharge (2012)

Cochrane Summary: Inhaled corticosteroids for acute asthma following emergency department discharge (2012)

Visit

Edmonds, ML, Milan, SJ, Brenner, BE, Camargo, CA, Rowe, BH,

Edmonds, ML, Milan, SJ, Brenner, BE, Camargo, CA, Rowe, BH,

Acuteasthma is a common cause of visits toemergencydepartments (ED) and the majority of patients are treated and discharged home. Some people will have arelapseofacuteasthma within two weeks of being discharged after apparently successful treatment. Beta2-agonist drugs are used to open the muscles in the airways and corticosteroids drugs are used to reduce inflammation of the swollen airways.Corticosteroidscan be inhaled (ICS) or swallowed as a tablet (so-calledoralcorticosteroids). ICS may reduceadverse effectsand get to the airways more directly thanoralcorticosteroids. Thisreviewof trials found that there was insufficient evidence that inhaling corticosteroids as well as taking the drugs orally is better thanoraluse alone, afteremergencydepartment treatment for an asthma attack. There is also insufficient evidence that taking ICS alone is as good as taking them orally, although there is some evidence to support using ICS alone for mild asthma attacks afteremergencydepartment discharge. Moreresearchis needed.

Cochrane Summary: Role of ketamine for management of acute severe asthma in children (2012)

Cochrane Summary: Role of ketamine for management of acute severe asthma in children (2012)

Visit

Jat, KR, Chawla, D,

Jat, KR, Chawla, D,

Children frequently visit theemergencydepartment foracuteexacerbation of asthma. Some of these children fail to respond tostandard treatment(corticosteroids and bronchodilators) with increasedmorbidity. Ketamine has bronchodilatory properties and may be useful foracuteexacerbation of asthma. We evaluated theefficacyof ketamine for management of severeacuteasthma in children who had not responded to standardtherapy. We found, through systematic search, only onestudywhere investigators assessed the usefulness of ketamine for management of severeacuteasthma in children. While this singlestudysuggested that there is a lack of evidence for usefulness of ketamine inacuteexacerbation of asthma in children, more trials are needed regarding the use of ketamine inacuteasthma before more specific recommendations can be made.

Cochrane Summary: What are the effects of educational interventions delivered to children and/or their families, who have experienced an emergency department visit with their asthma within the previous 12 months? (2010)

Cochrane Summary: What are the effects of educational interventions delivered to children and/or their families, who have experienced an emergency department visit with their asthma within the previous 12 months? (2010)

Visit

Boyd, M, Lasserson, TJ, McKean, MC, Gibson, PG, Ducharme, FM, Haby, M,

Boyd, M, Lasserson, TJ, McKean, MC, Gibson, PG, Ducharme, FM, Haby, M,

Asthma care for children in our society is common and costly. There is now evidence that educationalinterventionfor children who have attended theemergencydepartment for asthma lowers theriskof the need for futureemergencydepartment visits and hospital admissions. Thisreviewlooked at studies which compared usual care for asthma to more intensive educational programmes and the results showed astatistically significantreduction in the treatment groups needing subsequentemergencydepartment visits or hospital admissions. We were not able to determine the most effective type, duration or intensity ofeducationthat should be offered to children to offer the best asthma outcomes.

Cochrane Summary: Magnesium sulfate for treating exacerbations of acute asthma in the emergency department (2009)

Cochrane Summary: Magnesium sulfate for treating exacerbations of acute asthma in the emergency department (2009)

Visit

Rowe, BH, Bretzlaff, J, Bourdon, C, Bota, G, Blitz, S, Camargo, CA,

Rowe, BH, Bretzlaff, J, Bourdon, C, Bota, G, Blitz, S, Camargo, CA,

In an asthma attack, the airways (passages to the lungs) narrow from muscle spasms and swelling (inflammation). Bronchodilator drugs (reliever inhalers) can be used to relax the muscles and open the airways, and corticosteroid drugs to reduce the inflammation. Magnesium sulfate is a drug that can also affect muscles, and may reduce inflammation as well. It can be given through a drip in the veins (intravenously). Thereviewof trials found thatintravenousmagnesium sulfate in addition to bronchodilators seems to be safe and beneficial for people with severe asthma attacks, or those for whom bronchodilators are not working.

Cochrane Summary: Early emergency department treatment of acute asthma with systemic corticosteroids (2008)

Cochrane Summary: Early emergency department treatment of acute asthma with systemic corticosteroids (2008)

Visit

Rowe, BH, Spooner, C, Ducharme, F, Bretzlaff, J, Bota, G,

Rowe, BH, Spooner, C, Ducharme, F, Bretzlaff, J, Bota, G,

In an asthma attack, the airways (passages to the lungs) narrow from muscle spasms and swelling (inflammation). Bronchodilators (reliever inhalers to open up the lungs and airways) can be used for the spasms, and corticosteroids for the swelling.Corticosteroidscan be inhaled, or taken by mouth (orally) or through a drip into the veins (intravenously). Thereviewof trials found thatsystemic(oralorintravenous) corticosteroids reduce the need for people with asthma attacks to stay in hospital, with fewadverse effects.

Bacterial Meningitis English (4) French All (4)

Cochrane Summary: Fluids for people with acute bacterial meningitis  (2016)

Cochrane Summary: Fluids for people with acute bacterial meningitis

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Maconochie IK, Bhaumik S

Maconochie IK, Bhaumik S

Objective: To evaluate treatment of acute bacterial meningitis with differing volumes of initial fluid administration (up to 72 hours after first presentation) and the effects on death and neurological sequelae.

Cochrane Summary: Corticosteroids for bacterial meningitis  (2015)

Cochrane Summary: Corticosteroids for bacterial meningitis

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Brouwer MC, McIntyre P, Prasad K, Van de Beek D

Brouwer MC, McIntyre P, Prasad K, Van de Beek D

Objective: To examine the effect of adjuvant corticosteroid therapy versus placebo on mortality, hearing loss and neurological sequelae in people of all ages with acute bacterial meningitis.

Summary: Can a Clinical Prediction Rule Reliably Predict Pediatric Bacterial Meningitis?  (2015)

Summary: Can a Clinical Prediction Rule Reliably Predict Pediatric Bacterial Meningitis?

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Ostermayer DG, Koyfman A

Ostermayer DG, Koyfman A

Objective: To determine if a clinical prediction rule can reliably determine which children should be hospitalized and treated with intravenous antibiotics for bacterial meningitis.

Summary: In children with bacterial meningitis, does the addition of dexamethasone to an antibiotic treatment regimen result in a better clinical outcome than the antibiotic regimen alone?: Part A: Evidence-based answer and summary  (2006)

Summary: In children with bacterial meningitis, does the addition of dexamethasone to an antibiotic treatment regimen result in a better clinical outcome than the antibiotic regimen alone?: Part A: Evidence-based answer and summary

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Fox JL

Fox JL

Objective: To determine the efficacy of adjuvant dexamethasone therapy in paediatric bacterial meningitis.

Cochrane Summary: Fluids for people with acute bacterial meningitis  (2016)

Cochrane Summary: Fluids for people with acute bacterial meningitis

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Maconochie IK, Bhaumik S

Maconochie IK, Bhaumik S

Objective: To evaluate treatment of acute bacterial meningitis with differing volumes of initial fluid administration (up to 72 hours after first presentation) and the effects on death and neurological sequelae.

Cochrane Summary: Corticosteroids for bacterial meningitis  (2015)

Cochrane Summary: Corticosteroids for bacterial meningitis

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Brouwer MC, McIntyre P, Prasad K, Van de Beek D

Brouwer MC, McIntyre P, Prasad K, Van de Beek D

Objective: To examine the effect of adjuvant corticosteroid therapy versus placebo on mortality, hearing loss and neurological sequelae in people of all ages with acute bacterial meningitis.

Summary: Can a Clinical Prediction Rule Reliably Predict Pediatric Bacterial Meningitis?  (2015)

Summary: Can a Clinical Prediction Rule Reliably Predict Pediatric Bacterial Meningitis?

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Ostermayer DG, Koyfman A

Ostermayer DG, Koyfman A

Objective: To determine if a clinical prediction rule can reliably determine which children should be hospitalized and treated with intravenous antibiotics for bacterial meningitis.

Summary: In children with bacterial meningitis, does the addition of dexamethasone to an antibiotic treatment regimen result in a better clinical outcome than the antibiotic regimen alone?: Part A: Evidence-based answer and summary  (2006)

Summary: In children with bacterial meningitis, does the addition of dexamethasone to an antibiotic treatment regimen result in a better clinical outcome than the antibiotic regimen alone?: Part A: Evidence-based answer and summary

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Fox JL

Fox JL

Objective: To determine the efficacy of adjuvant dexamethasone therapy in paediatric bacterial meningitis.

Bronchiolitis English (8) French All (8)

Overview of Systematic Reviews: Evidence Summary: Bronchiolitis  (2014)

Overview of Systematic Reviews: Evidence Summary: Bronchiolitis

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Alberta Research Centre for Health Evidence (ARCHE)

Alberta Research Centre for Health Evidence (ARCHE)

Evidence summary for the treatment and management of bronchiolitis.

Cochrane Summary: Antibiotics for bronchiolitis in children under two years of age  (2014)

Cochrane Summary: Antibiotics for bronchiolitis in children under two years of age

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Farley R, Spurling GK, Eriksson L, Del Mar CB

Farley R, Spurling GK, Eriksson L, Del Mar CB

This review summarizes evidence on the effect of antibiotics on clinical outcomes in children with bronchiolitis.

Cochrane Summary: Bronchodilators for bronchiolitis for infants with first-time wheezing  (2014)

Cochrane Summary: Bronchodilators for bronchiolitis for infants with first-time wheezing

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Gadomski AM, Scribani MB

Gadomski AM, Scribani MB

This review summarizes the evidence about the effect of bronchodilators in infants with bronchiolitis.

Overview of Systematic Reviews: The Cochrane Library and safety of systemic corticosteroids for acute respiratory conditions in children: An overview of reviews  (2014)

Overview of Systematic Reviews: The Cochrane Library and safety of systemic corticosteroids for acute respiratory conditions in children: An overview of reviews

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Fernandes RM, Oleszczuk M, Woods CR, Rowe BH, Cates CJ, Hartling L.

Fernandes RM, Oleszczuk M, Woods CR, Rowe BH, Cates CJ, Hartling L.

Objective: To examine clinically relevant short-term safety outcomes related to acute single or recurrent systemic short-term (<2 weeks) corticosteroid use based on systematic reviews of acute respiratory conditions.

Cochrane Summary: Hypertonic saline solution administered via nebuliser for acute bronchiolitis in infants  (2013)

Cochrane Summary: Hypertonic saline solution administered via nebuliser for acute bronchiolitis in infants

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Zhang L, Mendoza-Sassi RA, Wainwright C, Klassen TP

Zhang L, Mendoza-Sassi RA, Wainwright C, Klassen TP

Objective: to assess the effects of nebulised hypertonic ( 3%) saline solution in infants with acute viral bronchiolitis.

Cochrane Summary: Glucocorticoids for acute viral bronchiolitis in infants and young children under two years of age  (2013)

Cochrane Summary: Glucocorticoids for acute viral bronchiolitis in infants and young children under two years of age

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Fernandes RM, Bialy LM, Vandermeer B, Tjosvold L, Plint AC, Patel H, Johnson DW, Klassen TP, Hartling L

Fernandes RM, Bialy LM, Vandermeer B, Tjosvold L, Plint AC, Patel H, Johnson ...

Objective: to review the efficacy and safety of systemic and inhaled glucocorticoids in children with acute viral bronchiolitis.

Overview of Systematic Reviews: The Cochrane Library and the treatment of bronchiolitis in children: An overview of reviews  (2011)

Overview of Systematic Reviews: The Cochrane Library and the treatment of bronchiolitis in children: An overview of reviews

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Bialy L, Foisy M, Smith M, Fernandes RM

Bialy L, Foisy M, Smith M, Fernandes RM

This updated overview of reviews aims to synthesize evidence from the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) on the effectiveness and safety of 11 pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatments to improve bronchiolitis symptoms in outpatient, inpatient and intensive care populations.

Cochrane Summary: Epinephrine for acute viral bronchiolitis in children less than two years of age  (2011)

Cochrane Summary: Epinephrine for acute viral bronchiolitis in children less than two years of age

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Hartling L, Bialy LM, Vandermeer B, Tjosvold L, Johnson DW, Plint AC, Klassen TP, Patel H, Fernandes RM

Hartling L, Bialy LM, Vandermeer B, Tjosvold L, Johnson DW, Plint AC, Klassen...

Objective: to examine the efficacy and safety of epinephrine in children less than two with acute viral bronchiolitis.

Overview of Systematic Reviews: Evidence Summary: Bronchiolitis  (2014)

Overview of Systematic Reviews: Evidence Summary: Bronchiolitis

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Alberta Research Centre for Health Evidence (ARCHE)

Alberta Research Centre for Health Evidence (ARCHE)

Evidence summary for the treatment and management of bronchiolitis.

Cochrane Summary: Antibiotics for bronchiolitis in children under two years of age  (2014)

Cochrane Summary: Antibiotics for bronchiolitis in children under two years of age

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Farley R, Spurling GK, Eriksson L, Del Mar CB

Farley R, Spurling GK, Eriksson L, Del Mar CB

This review summarizes evidence on the effect of antibiotics on clinical outcomes in children with bronchiolitis.

Cochrane Summary: Bronchodilators for bronchiolitis for infants with first-time wheezing  (2014)

Cochrane Summary: Bronchodilators for bronchiolitis for infants with first-time wheezing

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Gadomski AM, Scribani MB

Gadomski AM, Scribani MB

This review summarizes the evidence about the effect of bronchodilators in infants with bronchiolitis.

Overview of Systematic Reviews: The Cochrane Library and safety of systemic corticosteroids for acute respiratory conditions in children: An overview of reviews  (2014)

Overview of Systematic Reviews: The Cochrane Library and safety of systemic corticosteroids for acute respiratory conditions in children: An overview of reviews

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Fernandes RM, Oleszczuk M, Woods CR, Rowe BH, Cates CJ, Hartling L.

Fernandes RM, Oleszczuk M, Woods CR, Rowe BH, Cates CJ, Hartling L.

Objective: To examine clinically relevant short-term safety outcomes related to acute single or recurrent systemic short-term (<2 weeks) corticosteroid use based on systematic reviews of acute respiratory conditions.

Cochrane Summary: Hypertonic saline solution administered via nebuliser for acute bronchiolitis in infants  (2013)

Cochrane Summary: Hypertonic saline solution administered via nebuliser for acute bronchiolitis in infants

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Zhang L, Mendoza-Sassi RA, Wainwright C, Klassen TP

Zhang L, Mendoza-Sassi RA, Wainwright C, Klassen TP

Objective: to assess the effects of nebulised hypertonic ( 3%) saline solution in infants with acute viral bronchiolitis.

Cochrane Summary: Glucocorticoids for acute viral bronchiolitis in infants and young children under two years of age  (2013)

Cochrane Summary: Glucocorticoids for acute viral bronchiolitis in infants and young children under two years of age

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Fernandes RM, Bialy LM, Vandermeer B, Tjosvold L, Plint AC, Patel H, Johnson DW, Klassen TP, Hartling L

Fernandes RM, Bialy LM, Vandermeer B, Tjosvold L, Plint AC, Patel H, Johnson ...

Objective: to review the efficacy and safety of systemic and inhaled glucocorticoids in children with acute viral bronchiolitis.

Overview of Systematic Reviews: The Cochrane Library and the treatment of bronchiolitis in children: An overview of reviews  (2011)

Overview of Systematic Reviews: The Cochrane Library and the treatment of bronchiolitis in children: An overview of reviews

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Bialy L, Foisy M, Smith M, Fernandes RM

Bialy L, Foisy M, Smith M, Fernandes RM

This updated overview of reviews aims to synthesize evidence from the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) on the effectiveness and safety of 11 pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatments to improve bronchiolitis symptoms in outpatient, inpatient and intensive care populations.

Cochrane Summary: Epinephrine for acute viral bronchiolitis in children less than two years of age  (2011)

Cochrane Summary: Epinephrine for acute viral bronchiolitis in children less than two years of age

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Hartling L, Bialy LM, Vandermeer B, Tjosvold L, Johnson DW, Plint AC, Klassen TP, Patel H, Fernandes RM

Hartling L, Bialy LM, Vandermeer B, Tjosvold L, Johnson DW, Plint AC, Klassen...

Objective: to examine the efficacy and safety of epinephrine in children less than two with acute viral bronchiolitis.

Burns English (3) French All (3)

Cochrane Summary: Antiseptics for Burns  (2017)

Cochrane Summary: Antiseptics for Burns

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Norman G, Christie J, Liu Z, Westby MJ, Jefferies JM, Hudson T, Edwards J, Mohapatra DP, Hassan IA, Dumville JC

Norman G, Christie J, Liu Z, Westby MJ, Jefferies JM, Hudson T, Edwards J, Mo...

Objective: To assess the effects and safety of antiseptics for the treatment of burns in any care setting.

Cochrane Summary: Antibiotics to prevent burn wounds becoming infected  (2013)

Cochrane Summary: Antibiotics to prevent burn wounds becoming infected

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Barajas-Nava LA, Lpez-Alcalde J, Roqu i Figuls M, Sol I, Bonfill Cosp X

Barajas-Nava LA, Lpez-Alcalde J, Roqu i Figuls M, Sol I, Bonfill Cosp X

Objective: To assess the effects of antibiotic prophylaxis on rates of burn wound infection.

Cochrane Summary: Dressings for treating superficial and partial-thickness burns  (2013)

Cochrane Summary: Dressings for treating superficial and partial-thickness burns

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Wasiak J, Cleland H, Campbell F, Spinks A

Wasiak J, Cleland H, Campbell F, Spinks A

Objective: To assess the effects of burn wound dressings on superficial and partial thickness burns.

Cochrane Summary: Antiseptics for Burns  (2017)

Cochrane Summary: Antiseptics for Burns

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Norman G, Christie J, Liu Z, Westby MJ, Jefferies JM, Hudson T, Edwards J, Mohapatra DP, Hassan IA, Dumville JC

Norman G, Christie J, Liu Z, Westby MJ, Jefferies JM, Hudson T, Edwards J, Mo...

Objective: To assess the effects and safety of antiseptics for the treatment of burns in any care setting.

Cochrane Summary: Antibiotics to prevent burn wounds becoming infected  (2013)

Cochrane Summary: Antibiotics to prevent burn wounds becoming infected

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Barajas-Nava LA, Lpez-Alcalde J, Roqu i Figuls M, Sol I, Bonfill Cosp X

Barajas-Nava LA, Lpez-Alcalde J, Roqu i Figuls M, Sol I, Bonfill Cosp X

Objective: To assess the effects of antibiotic prophylaxis on rates of burn wound infection.

Cochrane Summary: Dressings for treating superficial and partial-thickness burns  (2013)

Cochrane Summary: Dressings for treating superficial and partial-thickness burns

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Wasiak J, Cleland H, Campbell F, Spinks A

Wasiak J, Cleland H, Campbell F, Spinks A

Objective: To assess the effects of burn wound dressings on superficial and partial thickness burns.

Concussion English (1) French All (1)

Multimedia: Heads Up App (2013)

Multimedia: Heads Up App (2013)

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National Center for Injury Prevention and Control,

National Center for Injury Prevention and Control,

The Heads Up app will help you learn how to spot and what to do if you think your child or teen has a concussion or other serious brain injury.

Multimedia: Heads Up App (2013)

Multimedia: Heads Up App (2013)

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National Center for Injury Prevention and Control,

National Center for Injury Prevention and Control,

The Heads Up app will help you learn how to spot and what to do if you think your child or teen has a concussion or other serious brain injury.

Constipation English (3) French All (3)

Synthesis of Systematic Reviews: Treatment of Childhood Constipation: a synthesis of systematic reviews and meta-analyses  (2020)

Synthesis of Systematic Reviews: Treatment of Childhood Constipation: a synthesis of systematic reviews and meta-analyses

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Southwell BR

Southwell BR

In 2016, treatment of childhood constipation was extensively reviewed by Rome IV. This review covers meta-analyses and evidence for treatment of paediatric constipation since 2016 and new emerging treatments.

Cochrane Summary: Laxatives for the Management of Childhood Constipation  (2016)

Cochrane Summary: Laxatives for the Management of Childhood Constipation

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Gordon M, MacDonald JK, Parker CE, Akobeng AK, Thomas AG

Gordon M, MacDonald JK, Parker CE, Akobeng AK, Thomas AG

This summary addresses the questions: What are the effectiveness and side effects of osmotic and stimulant laxatives used for the treatment of functional childhood constipation?

Guideline Summary: Idiopathic Constipation in Children Clinical Practice Guidelines  (2015)

Guideline Summary: Idiopathic Constipation in Children Clinical Practice Guidelines

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Paul SP, Broad SR, Spray C

Paul SP, Broad SR, Spray C

This is a review of current guidelines for diagnosing and managing idiopathic constipation in children.

Synthesis of Systematic Reviews: Treatment of Childhood Constipation: a synthesis of systematic reviews and meta-analyses  (2020)

Synthesis of Systematic Reviews: Treatment of Childhood Constipation: a synthesis of systematic reviews and meta-analyses

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Southwell BR

Southwell BR

In 2016, treatment of childhood constipation was extensively reviewed by Rome IV. This review covers meta-analyses and evidence for treatment of paediatric constipation since 2016 and new emerging treatments.

Cochrane Summary: Laxatives for the Management of Childhood Constipation  (2016)

Cochrane Summary: Laxatives for the Management of Childhood Constipation

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Gordon M, MacDonald JK, Parker CE, Akobeng AK, Thomas AG

Gordon M, MacDonald JK, Parker CE, Akobeng AK, Thomas AG

This summary addresses the questions: What are the effectiveness and side effects of osmotic and stimulant laxatives used for the treatment of functional childhood constipation?

Guideline Summary: Idiopathic Constipation in Children Clinical Practice Guidelines  (2015)

Guideline Summary: Idiopathic Constipation in Children Clinical Practice Guidelines

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Paul SP, Broad SR, Spray C

Paul SP, Broad SR, Spray C

This is a review of current guidelines for diagnosing and managing idiopathic constipation in children.

Croup English (6) French All (6)

Cochrane Summary: Glucocorticoids for croup in children  (2018)

Cochrane Summary: Glucocorticoids for croup in children

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Gates A, Gates M, Vandermeer B, Johnson C, Hartling L, Johnson DW, Klassen TP,

Gates A, Gates M, Vandermeer B, Johnson C, Hartling L, Johnson DW, Klassen TP,

Objective: To examine the effects of glucocorticoids for the treatment of croup in children aged 0 to 18 years.

Cochrane Summary: Helium-oxygen (heliox) treatment for children with croup  (2018)

Cochrane Summary: Helium-oxygen (heliox) treatment for children with croup

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Moraa I, Sturman N, McGuire TM, van Driel ML,

Moraa I, Sturman N, McGuire TM, van Driel ML,

Objective: To examine the effect of heliox compared to oxygen or other active interventions, placebo, or no treatment, on relieving signs and symptoms in children with croup as determined by a croup score and rates of admission and intubation.

Summary: Evidence for Clinicians: Nebulized epinephrine for croup in children  (2015)

Summary: Evidence for Clinicians: Nebulized epinephrine for croup in children

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Kawaguchi A, Joffe A,

Kawaguchi A, Joffe A,

Expert commentary on the Cochrane Review on nebulized epinephrine for reducing symptoms in children with severe croup. 

Cochrane Overview: Evidence Summary: Croup  (2014)

Cochrane Overview: Evidence Summary: Croup

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Alberta Research Centre for Health Evidence (ARCHE),

Alberta Research Centre for Health Evidence (ARCHE),

The purpose of this document is to describe the effectiveness of four treatment options, based on a 2012 Overview of Reviews.

Cochrane Summary: Nebulized epinephrine for croup in children  (2013)

Cochrane Summary: Nebulized epinephrine for croup in children

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Bjornson, C, Russell, K, Vandermeer, B, Klassen, TP, Johnson, DW,

Bjornson, C, Russell, K, Vandermeer, B, Klassen, TP, Johnson, DW,

Objective: To assess the efficacy (measured by croup scores, rate of intubation and health care utilization such as rate of hospitalization) and safety (frequency and severity of side effects) of nebulized epinephrine versus placebo in children with croup, evaluated in an emergency department (ED) or hospital setting.

Cochrane Overview: The Cochrane Library and the treatment of croup in children: an overview of reviews  (2010)

Cochrane Overview: The Cochrane Library and the treatment of croup in children: an overview of reviews

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Bjornson, C, Russell, K, Foisy, M, Johnson, D,

Bjornson, C, Russell, K, Foisy, M, Johnson, D,

Objective: To synthesize the evidence currently in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) related to the clinical effectiveness and applicability of four treatments for croup - glucocorticoids, epinephrine, heliox and humidified air.

Cochrane Summary: Glucocorticoids for croup in children  (2018)

Cochrane Summary: Glucocorticoids for croup in children

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Gates A, Gates M, Vandermeer B, Johnson C, Hartling L, Johnson DW, Klassen TP,

Gates A, Gates M, Vandermeer B, Johnson C, Hartling L, Johnson DW, Klassen TP,

Objective: To examine the effects of glucocorticoids for the treatment of croup in children aged 0 to 18 years.

Cochrane Summary: Helium-oxygen (heliox) treatment for children with croup  (2018)

Cochrane Summary: Helium-oxygen (heliox) treatment for children with croup

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Moraa I, Sturman N, McGuire TM, van Driel ML,

Moraa I, Sturman N, McGuire TM, van Driel ML,

Objective: To examine the effect of heliox compared to oxygen or other active interventions, placebo, or no treatment, on relieving signs and symptoms in children with croup as determined by a croup score and rates of admission and intubation.

Summary: Evidence for Clinicians: Nebulized epinephrine for croup in children  (2015)

Summary: Evidence for Clinicians: Nebulized epinephrine for croup in children

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Kawaguchi A, Joffe A,

Kawaguchi A, Joffe A,

Expert commentary on the Cochrane Review on nebulized epinephrine for reducing symptoms in children with severe croup. 

Cochrane Overview: Evidence Summary: Croup  (2014)

Cochrane Overview: Evidence Summary: Croup

Download

Alberta Research Centre for Health Evidence (ARCHE),

Alberta Research Centre for Health Evidence (ARCHE),

The purpose of this document is to describe the effectiveness of four treatment options, based on a 2012 Overview of Reviews.

Cochrane Summary: Nebulized epinephrine for croup in children  (2013)

Cochrane Summary: Nebulized epinephrine for croup in children

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Bjornson, C, Russell, K, Vandermeer, B, Klassen, TP, Johnson, DW,

Bjornson, C, Russell, K, Vandermeer, B, Klassen, TP, Johnson, DW,

Objective: To assess the efficacy (measured by croup scores, rate of intubation and health care utilization such as rate of hospitalization) and safety (frequency and severity of side effects) of nebulized epinephrine versus placebo in children with croup, evaluated in an emergency department (ED) or hospital setting.

Cochrane Overview: The Cochrane Library and the treatment of croup in children: an overview of reviews  (2010)

Cochrane Overview: The Cochrane Library and the treatment of croup in children: an overview of reviews

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Bjornson, C, Russell, K, Foisy, M, Johnson, D,

Bjornson, C, Russell, K, Foisy, M, Johnson, D,

Objective: To synthesize the evidence currently in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) related to the clinical effectiveness and applicability of four treatments for croup - glucocorticoids, epinephrine, heliox and humidified air.

Febrile Status Epilepticus English (2) French All (2)

BMJ Clinical Review: Febrile seizures  (2015)

BMJ Clinical Review: Febrile seizures

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Patel N, Ram D, Swiderska N, Mewasingh LD, Newton RW, Offringa M

Patel N, Ram D, Swiderska N, Mewasingh LD, Newton RW, Offringa M

This review aims to summarise how to recognise a febrile seizure and rule out other underlying causes, how to manage febrile seizures and how to deal with common questions posed by parents in this situation.

Review: Evaluation and Management of Pediatric Febrile Seizures in the Emergency Department  (2011)

Review: Evaluation and Management of Pediatric Febrile Seizures in the Emergency Department

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Hampers LC, Spina LA

Hampers LC, Spina LA

This review describes the differences between simple and complex febrile seizures in pediatric patients. The document provides an overview of clinical assessment, laboratory testing, imaging and discharge instructions.

BMJ Clinical Review: Febrile seizures  (2015)

BMJ Clinical Review: Febrile seizures

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Patel N, Ram D, Swiderska N, Mewasingh LD, Newton RW, Offringa M

Patel N, Ram D, Swiderska N, Mewasingh LD, Newton RW, Offringa M

This review aims to summarise how to recognise a febrile seizure and rule out other underlying causes, how to manage febrile seizures and how to deal with common questions posed by parents in this situation.

Review: Evaluation and Management of Pediatric Febrile Seizures in the Emergency Department  (2011)

Review: Evaluation and Management of Pediatric Febrile Seizures in the Emergency Department

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Hampers LC, Spina LA

Hampers LC, Spina LA

This review describes the differences between simple and complex febrile seizures in pediatric patients. The document provides an overview of clinical assessment, laboratory testing, imaging and discharge instructions.

Fractures English (2) French All (2)

Book: Rockwood and Wilkins' Fractures in Children  (2014)

Book: Rockwood and Wilkins' Fractures in Children

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Flynn, JM, Skaggs, DL, Waters, PM

Flynn, JM, Skaggs, DL, Waters, PM

Written by leading orthopaedic surgeons from around the world, the revised and expanded 8th edition of this classic bestselling text presents complete, up-to-date coverage of all types of children's fractures.

Cochrane Summary: Antibiotics for preventing infection in open limb fractures  (2009)

Cochrane Summary: Antibiotics for preventing infection in open limb fractures

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Gosselin, RA, Roberts, I & Gillespie, WJ

Gosselin, RA, Roberts, I & Gillespie, WJ

Objective: To review the evidence for the effectiveness of antibiotics in the initial treatment of open fractures of the limbs.

Book: Rockwood and Wilkins' Fractures in Children  (2014)

Book: Rockwood and Wilkins' Fractures in Children

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Flynn, JM, Skaggs, DL, Waters, PM

Flynn, JM, Skaggs, DL, Waters, PM

Written by leading orthopaedic surgeons from around the world, the revised and expanded 8th edition of this classic bestselling text presents complete, up-to-date coverage of all types of children's fractures.

Cochrane Summary: Antibiotics for preventing infection in open limb fractures  (2009)

Cochrane Summary: Antibiotics for preventing infection in open limb fractures

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Gosselin, RA, Roberts, I & Gillespie, WJ

Gosselin, RA, Roberts, I & Gillespie, WJ

Objective: To review the evidence for the effectiveness of antibiotics in the initial treatment of open fractures of the limbs.

Intussusception English (6) French All (6)

Cochrane Summary: Vaccines for preventing rotavirus diarrhoea: vaccines in use  (2019)

Cochrane Summary: Vaccines for preventing rotavirus diarrhoea: vaccines in use

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Soares-Weiser K, Maclehose H, Bergman H, Ben-Aharon I, Nagpal S, Goldberg E, Pitan F, Cunliffe N,

Soares-Weiser K, Maclehose H, Bergman H, Ben-Aharon I, Nagpal S, Goldberg E, ...

Objective: To evaluate rotavirus vaccines approved for use (RV1, RV5, and LLR) for preventing rotavirus diarrhoea.

Cochrane Summary: Management of intussusception in children  (2017)

Cochrane Summary: Management of intussusception in children

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Gluckman S, Karpelowsky J, Webster AC, McGee RG

Gluckman S, Karpelowsky J, Webster AC, McGee RG

Objective: To assess the safety and effectiveness of non-surgical and surgical approaches in the management of intussusception in children.

Evidence Summary: Towards evidence based medicine for paediatricians. Question 3. Does the administration of glucagon improve the rate of radiological reduction in children with acute intestinal intussusception?  (2012)

Evidence Summary: Towards evidence based medicine for paediatricians. Question 3. Does the administration of glucagon improve the rate of radiological reduction in children with acute intestinal intussusception?

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Cachat F, Ramseyer P,

Cachat F, Ramseyer P,

This summary examines the relationship between glucagon and the rate of radiological reduction for acute intestinal intussusception.

Evidence Summary: Towards evidence based emergency medicine: best BETs from the Manchester Royal Infirmary. BET 2: Can emergency physicians safely rule in or rule out paediatric intussusception in the emergency department using bedside ultrasound?  (2012)

Evidence Summary: Towards evidence based emergency medicine: best BETs from the Manchester Royal Infirmary. BET 2: Can emergency physicians safely rule in or rule out paediatric intussusception in the emergency department using bedside ultrasound?

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Raymond-Dufresne , Ghanayem H,

Raymond-Dufresne , Ghanayem H,

This summary investigates the diagnostic use of bedside ultrasound for paediatric intussusception in the emergency department.

Evidence Summary: Best evidence topic reports. Bet 4. Role of plain abdominal radiograph in the diagnosis of intussusception  (2008)

Evidence Summary: Best evidence topic reports. Bet 4. Role of plain abdominal radiograph in the diagnosis of intussusception

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Broomfield D, Maconochie I,

Broomfield D, Maconochie I,

This summary investigates the role of plain abdominal radiograph in the diagnosis of intussusception

Evidence Summary: Clinically suspected intussusception in children: evidence based review and self-assessment module  (2005)

Evidence Summary: Clinically suspected intussusception in children: evidence based review and self-assessment module

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Applegate KE,

Applegate KE,

This summary uses case examples to review the current evidence for the management of children with clinically suspected intussusception.

Cochrane Summary: Vaccines for preventing rotavirus diarrhoea: vaccines in use  (2019)

Cochrane Summary: Vaccines for preventing rotavirus diarrhoea: vaccines in use

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Soares-Weiser K, Maclehose H, Bergman H, Ben-Aharon I, Nagpal S, Goldberg E, Pitan F, Cunliffe N,

Soares-Weiser K, Maclehose H, Bergman H, Ben-Aharon I, Nagpal S, Goldberg E, ...

Objective: To evaluate rotavirus vaccines approved for use (RV1, RV5, and LLR) for preventing rotavirus diarrhoea.

Cochrane Summary: Management of intussusception in children  (2017)

Cochrane Summary: Management of intussusception in children

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Gluckman S, Karpelowsky J, Webster AC, McGee RG

Gluckman S, Karpelowsky J, Webster AC, McGee RG

Objective: To assess the safety and effectiveness of non-surgical and surgical approaches in the management of intussusception in children.

Evidence Summary: Towards evidence based medicine for paediatricians. Question 3. Does the administration of glucagon improve the rate of radiological reduction in children with acute intestinal intussusception?  (2012)

Evidence Summary: Towards evidence based medicine for paediatricians. Question 3. Does the administration of glucagon improve the rate of radiological reduction in children with acute intestinal intussusception?

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Cachat F, Ramseyer P,

Cachat F, Ramseyer P,

This summary examines the relationship between glucagon and the rate of radiological reduction for acute intestinal intussusception.

Evidence Summary: Towards evidence based emergency medicine: best BETs from the Manchester Royal Infirmary. BET 2: Can emergency physicians safely rule in or rule out paediatric intussusception in the emergency department using bedside ultrasound?  (2012)

Evidence Summary: Towards evidence based emergency medicine: best BETs from the Manchester Royal Infirmary. BET 2: Can emergency physicians safely rule in or rule out paediatric intussusception in the emergency department using bedside ultrasound?

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Raymond-Dufresne , Ghanayem H,

Raymond-Dufresne , Ghanayem H,

This summary investigates the diagnostic use of bedside ultrasound for paediatric intussusception in the emergency department.

Evidence Summary: Best evidence topic reports. Bet 4. Role of plain abdominal radiograph in the diagnosis of intussusception  (2008)

Evidence Summary: Best evidence topic reports. Bet 4. Role of plain abdominal radiograph in the diagnosis of intussusception

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Broomfield D, Maconochie I,

Broomfield D, Maconochie I,

This summary investigates the role of plain abdominal radiograph in the diagnosis of intussusception

Evidence Summary: Clinically suspected intussusception in children: evidence based review and self-assessment module  (2005)

Evidence Summary: Clinically suspected intussusception in children: evidence based review and self-assessment module

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Applegate KE,

Applegate KE,

This summary uses case examples to review the current evidence for the management of children with clinically suspected intussusception.

Lower Extremity Fractures English (1) French All (1)

Cochrane Summary: Different methods of treating fractures of the shaft of the thigh bone in children and adolescents  (2014)

Cochrane Summary: Different methods of treating fractures of the shaft of the thigh bone in children and adolescents

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Madhuri, V, Dutt, V, Gahukamble, AD & Tharyan, P

Madhuri, V, Dutt, V, Gahukamble, AD & Tharyan, P

Objective: To assess the effects (benefits and harms) of interventions for treating femoral shaft fractures in children and adolescents.

Cochrane Summary: Different methods of treating fractures of the shaft of the thigh bone in children and adolescents  (2014)

Cochrane Summary: Different methods of treating fractures of the shaft of the thigh bone in children and adolescents

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Madhuri, V, Dutt, V, Gahukamble, AD & Tharyan, P

Madhuri, V, Dutt, V, Gahukamble, AD & Tharyan, P

Objective: To assess the effects (benefits and harms) of interventions for treating femoral shaft fractures in children and adolescents.

Lyme Disease English (1) French All (1)

Cochrane Summary: Treatment for the neurological complications of Lyme disease  (2016)

Cochrane Summary: Treatment for the neurological complications of Lyme disease

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Cadavid D, Auwaerter PG, Rumbaugh J, Gelderblom H

Cadavid D, Auwaerter PG, Rumbaugh J, Gelderblom H

Objective: To assess the effects of antibiotics for the treatment of Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB).

Cochrane Summary: Treatment for the neurological complications of Lyme disease  (2016)

Cochrane Summary: Treatment for the neurological complications of Lyme disease

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Cadavid D, Auwaerter PG, Rumbaugh J, Gelderblom H

Cadavid D, Auwaerter PG, Rumbaugh J, Gelderblom H

Objective: To assess the effects of antibiotics for the treatment of Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB).

Meningitis English (5) French All (5)

Cochrane Summary: Fluids for people with acute bacterial meningitis  (2016)

Cochrane Summary: Fluids for people with acute bacterial meningitis

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Maconochie IK, Bhaumik S

Maconochie IK, Bhaumik S

Objective: To evaluate treatment of acute bacterial meningitis with differing volumes of initial fluid administration (up to 72 hours after first presentation) and the effects on death and neurological sequelae.

Cochrane Summary: Treatment for the neurological complications of Lyme disease  (2016)

Cochrane Summary: Treatment for the neurological complications of Lyme disease

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Cadavid D, Auwaerter PG, Rumbaugh J, Gelderblom H

Cadavid D, Auwaerter PG, Rumbaugh J, Gelderblom H

Objective: To assess the effects of antibiotics for the treatment of Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB).

Cochrane Summary: Corticosteroids for bacterial meningitis  (2015)

Cochrane Summary: Corticosteroids for bacterial meningitis

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Brouwer MC, McIntyre P, Prasad K, Van de Beek D

Brouwer MC, McIntyre P, Prasad K, Van de Beek D

Objective: To examine the effect of adjuvant corticosteroid therapy versus placebo on mortality, hearing loss and neurological sequelae in people of all ages with acute bacterial meningitis.

Summary: Can a Clinical Prediction Rule Reliably Predict Pediatric Bacterial Meningitis?  (2015)

Summary: Can a Clinical Prediction Rule Reliably Predict Pediatric Bacterial Meningitis?

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Ostermayer DG, Koyfman A

Ostermayer DG, Koyfman A

Objective: To determine if a clinical prediction rule can reliably determine which children should be hospitalized and treated with intravenous antibiotics for bacterial meningitis.

Summary: In children with bacterial meningitis, does the addition of dexamethasone to an antibiotic treatment regimen result in a better clinical outcome than the antibiotic regimen alone?: Part A: Evidence-based answer and summary  (2006)

Summary: In children with bacterial meningitis, does the addition of dexamethasone to an antibiotic treatment regimen result in a better clinical outcome than the antibiotic regimen alone?: Part A: Evidence-based answer and summary

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Fox JL

Fox JL

Objective: To determine the efficacy of adjuvant dexamethasone therapy in paediatric bacterial meningitis.

Cochrane Summary: Fluids for people with acute bacterial meningitis  (2016)

Cochrane Summary: Fluids for people with acute bacterial meningitis

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Maconochie IK, Bhaumik S

Maconochie IK, Bhaumik S

Objective: To evaluate treatment of acute bacterial meningitis with differing volumes of initial fluid administration (up to 72 hours after first presentation) and the effects on death and neurological sequelae.

Cochrane Summary: Treatment for the neurological complications of Lyme disease  (2016)

Cochrane Summary: Treatment for the neurological complications of Lyme disease

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Cadavid D, Auwaerter PG, Rumbaugh J, Gelderblom H

Cadavid D, Auwaerter PG, Rumbaugh J, Gelderblom H

Objective: To assess the effects of antibiotics for the treatment of Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB).

Cochrane Summary: Corticosteroids for bacterial meningitis  (2015)

Cochrane Summary: Corticosteroids for bacterial meningitis

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Brouwer MC, McIntyre P, Prasad K, Van de Beek D

Brouwer MC, McIntyre P, Prasad K, Van de Beek D

Objective: To examine the effect of adjuvant corticosteroid therapy versus placebo on mortality, hearing loss and neurological sequelae in people of all ages with acute bacterial meningitis.

Summary: Can a Clinical Prediction Rule Reliably Predict Pediatric Bacterial Meningitis?  (2015)

Summary: Can a Clinical Prediction Rule Reliably Predict Pediatric Bacterial Meningitis?

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Ostermayer DG, Koyfman A

Ostermayer DG, Koyfman A

Objective: To determine if a clinical prediction rule can reliably determine which children should be hospitalized and treated with intravenous antibiotics for bacterial meningitis.

Summary: In children with bacterial meningitis, does the addition of dexamethasone to an antibiotic treatment regimen result in a better clinical outcome than the antibiotic regimen alone?: Part A: Evidence-based answer and summary  (2006)

Summary: In children with bacterial meningitis, does the addition of dexamethasone to an antibiotic treatment regimen result in a better clinical outcome than the antibiotic regimen alone?: Part A: Evidence-based answer and summary

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Fox JL

Fox JL

Objective: To determine the efficacy of adjuvant dexamethasone therapy in paediatric bacterial meningitis.

Procedural Pain English (11) French All (11)

Cochrane Summary: Psychological interventions for needle-related procedural pain and distress in children and adolescents  (2018)

Cochrane Summary: Psychological interventions for needle-related procedural pain and distress in children and adolescents

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Birnie KA, Noel M, Chambers CT, Uman LS, Parker JA

Birnie KA, Noel M, Chambers CT, Uman LS, Parker JA

To assess the efficacy of psychological interventions for needlerelated procedural pain and distress in children and adolescents.

Cochrane Summary: Local anaesthesia (numbing medicine) that is directly applied to the skin can provide pain control for repair of skin lacerations  (2017)

Cochrane Summary: Local anaesthesia (numbing medicine) that is directly applied to the skin can provide pain control for repair of skin lacerations

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Tayeb BO, Eidelman A, Eidelman CL, McNicol ED, Carr DB

Tayeb BO, Eidelman A, Eidelman CL, McNicol ED, Carr DB

To assess whether benefits of noninvasive topical anaesthetic application occur at the expense of decreased analgesic efficacy. To compare the efficacy of various singlecomponent or multicomponent topical anaesthetic agents for repair of dermal laceration

Cochrane Summary: Skin-to-skin care with newborns cuts down procedural pain  (2017)

Cochrane Summary: Skin-to-skin care with newborns cuts down procedural pain

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Johnston C, Campbell-Yeo M, Disher T, Benoit B, Fernandes A, Streiner D, Inglis D, Zee R

Johnston C, Campbell-Yeo M, Disher T, Benoit B, Fernandes A, Streiner D, Ingl...

The primary objectives were to determine the effect of SSC alone on pain from medical or nursing procedures in neonates compared to no intervention, sucrose or other analgesics, or additions to simple SSC such as rocking; and to determine the effects of t

Cochrane Summary: Sucrose for analgesia in newborn infants undergoing painful procedures  (2016)

Cochrane Summary: Sucrose for analgesia in newborn infants undergoing painful procedures

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Stevens B, Yamada J, Ohlsson A, Haliburton S, Shorkey A

Stevens B, Yamada J, Ohlsson A, Haliburton S, Shorkey A

The secondary objectives were to determine the safety of SSC care for relieving procedural pain in infants; and to compare the SSC effect in different postmenstrual age subgroups of infants.

Cochrane Summary: Sweet taste to ease injection needle pain in children aged one to 16 years  (2015)

Cochrane Summary: Sweet taste to ease injection needle pain in children aged one to 16 years

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Harrison D, Yamada J, Adams-Webber T, Ohlsson A, Beyene J, Stevens B

Harrison D, Yamada J, Adams-Webber T, Ohlsson A, Beyene J, Stevens B

This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 10, 2011: Sweet tasting solutions for reduction of needle-related procedural pain in children aged one to 16 years. We re-ran the search in October 2014. Review question: Do swe

Cochrane Summary: Nonpharmacological management of infant and young child procedural pain  (2015)

Cochrane Summary: Nonpharmacological management of infant and young child procedural pain

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Pillai Riddell RR, Racine NM, Gennis HG, Turcotte K, Uman LS, Horton RE, Ahola Kohut S, Hillgrove Stuart J, Stevens B, Lisi DM

Pillai Riddell RR, Racine NM, Gennis HG, Turcotte K, Uman LS, Horton RE, Ahol...

We examined 13 different types of commonly investigated non-pharmacological treatments (excluding breastmilk, sucrose, and music) to determine theirefficacyfor pain reactions after an acutely painful procedure (right after the needle ('pain reactivity') a

Cochrane Summary: Sweet-tasting solutions for needle-related pain in infants up to one year of age  (2013)

Cochrane Summary: Sweet-tasting solutions for needle-related pain in infants up to one year of age

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Kassab M, Foster JP, Foureu M, Fowle C

Kassab M, Foster JP, Foureu M, Fowle C

The use of needles that break the skin and cause pain is a common practice around the world with babies aged between one month and 12 months (Appendix 4). In thisreviewwe were interested in whether giving babies sugar-based solutions to taste when the nee

Cochrane Overview: The Cochrane Library and procedural pain in children: an overview of reviews  (2012)

Cochrane Overview: The Cochrane Library and procedural pain in children: an overview of reviews

Visit

Curtis S, Wingert A, Ali S

Curtis S, Wingert A, Ali S

Objective: To summarize Cochrane reviews assessing the effects of various interventions used for pain in non-neonatal children undergoing painful medical procedures.

Cochrane Summary: Breastfeeding or breast milk for procedural pain in neonates  (2012)

Cochrane Summary: Breastfeeding or breast milk for procedural pain in neonates

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Shah PS, Herbozo C, Aliwalas LL, Shah VS

Shah PS, Herbozo C, Aliwalas LL, Shah VS

Breastfeeding provides pain relief for newborn babies undergoing painful procedures. Medicine for pain relief is commonly given for major painful procedures, but may not be given for minor painful procedures such as blood sampling (by heel prick orvenepun

Cochrane Summary: Venepuncture versus heel lance for blood sampling in term neonates  (2011)

Cochrane Summary: Venepuncture versus heel lance for blood sampling in term neonates

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Shah V, Ohlsson A

Shah V, Ohlsson A

In most countries, a blood sample from newborn babies is needed forscreeningtests. A heel lance is the standard way of taking blood, but it is a painful procedure with no optimal method of pain relief known. Thisreviewof trials found evidence thatvenepunc

Cochrane Summary: Tissue adhesives for traumatic lacerations in children and adults  (2002)

Cochrane Summary: Tissue adhesives for traumatic lacerations in children and adults

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Farion K, Osmond MH, Hartling L, Russell K, Klassen T, Crumley E, Wiebe N

Farion K, Osmond MH, Hartling L, Russell K, Klassen T, Crumley E, Wiebe N

Cuts (lacerations) often need to be closed to ensure proper healing, and prevent infection or unattractivescarring. Wounds may be closed with stitches (sutures), staples, tapes or glue (tissueadhesive). Thereviewfound that glue is an excellent substitute

Cochrane Summary: Psychological interventions for needle-related procedural pain and distress in children and adolescents  (2018)

Cochrane Summary: Psychological interventions for needle-related procedural pain and distress in children and adolescents

Visit

Birnie KA, Noel M, Chambers CT, Uman LS, Parker JA

Birnie KA, Noel M, Chambers CT, Uman LS, Parker JA

To assess the efficacy of psychological interventions for needlerelated procedural pain and distress in children and adolescents.

Cochrane Summary: Local anaesthesia (numbing medicine) that is directly applied to the skin can provide pain control for repair of skin lacerations  (2017)

Cochrane Summary: Local anaesthesia (numbing medicine) that is directly applied to the skin can provide pain control for repair of skin lacerations

Visit

Tayeb BO, Eidelman A, Eidelman CL, McNicol ED, Carr DB

Tayeb BO, Eidelman A, Eidelman CL, McNicol ED, Carr DB

To assess whether benefits of noninvasive topical anaesthetic application occur at the expense of decreased analgesic efficacy. To compare the efficacy of various singlecomponent or multicomponent topical anaesthetic agents for repair of dermal laceration

Cochrane Summary: Skin-to-skin care with newborns cuts down procedural pain  (2017)

Cochrane Summary: Skin-to-skin care with newborns cuts down procedural pain

Visit

Johnston C, Campbell-Yeo M, Disher T, Benoit B, Fernandes A, Streiner D, Inglis D, Zee R

Johnston C, Campbell-Yeo M, Disher T, Benoit B, Fernandes A, Streiner D, Ingl...

The primary objectives were to determine the effect of SSC alone on pain from medical or nursing procedures in neonates compared to no intervention, sucrose or other analgesics, or additions to simple SSC such as rocking; and to determine the effects of t

Cochrane Summary: Sucrose for analgesia in newborn infants undergoing painful procedures  (2016)

Cochrane Summary: Sucrose for analgesia in newborn infants undergoing painful procedures

Visit

Stevens B, Yamada J, Ohlsson A, Haliburton S, Shorkey A

Stevens B, Yamada J, Ohlsson A, Haliburton S, Shorkey A

The secondary objectives were to determine the safety of SSC care for relieving procedural pain in infants; and to compare the SSC effect in different postmenstrual age subgroups of infants.

Cochrane Summary: Sweet taste to ease injection needle pain in children aged one to 16 years  (2015)

Cochrane Summary: Sweet taste to ease injection needle pain in children aged one to 16 years

Visit

Harrison D, Yamada J, Adams-Webber T, Ohlsson A, Beyene J, Stevens B

Harrison D, Yamada J, Adams-Webber T, Ohlsson A, Beyene J, Stevens B

This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 10, 2011: Sweet tasting solutions for reduction of needle-related procedural pain in children aged one to 16 years. We re-ran the search in October 2014. Review question: Do swe

Cochrane Summary: Nonpharmacological management of infant and young child procedural pain  (2015)

Cochrane Summary: Nonpharmacological management of infant and young child procedural pain

Visit

Pillai Riddell RR, Racine NM, Gennis HG, Turcotte K, Uman LS, Horton RE, Ahola Kohut S, Hillgrove Stuart J, Stevens B, Lisi DM

Pillai Riddell RR, Racine NM, Gennis HG, Turcotte K, Uman LS, Horton RE, Ahol...

We examined 13 different types of commonly investigated non-pharmacological treatments (excluding breastmilk, sucrose, and music) to determine theirefficacyfor pain reactions after an acutely painful procedure (right after the needle ('pain reactivity') a

Cochrane Summary: Sweet-tasting solutions for needle-related pain in infants up to one year of age  (2013)

Cochrane Summary: Sweet-tasting solutions for needle-related pain in infants up to one year of age

Visit

Kassab M, Foster JP, Foureu M, Fowle C

Kassab M, Foster JP, Foureu M, Fowle C

The use of needles that break the skin and cause pain is a common practice around the world with babies aged between one month and 12 months (Appendix 4). In thisreviewwe were interested in whether giving babies sugar-based solutions to taste when the nee

Cochrane Overview: The Cochrane Library and procedural pain in children: an overview of reviews  (2012)

Cochrane Overview: The Cochrane Library and procedural pain in children: an overview of reviews

Visit

Curtis S, Wingert A, Ali S

Curtis S, Wingert A, Ali S

Objective: To summarize Cochrane reviews assessing the effects of various interventions used for pain in non-neonatal children undergoing painful medical procedures.

Cochrane Summary: Breastfeeding or breast milk for procedural pain in neonates  (2012)

Cochrane Summary: Breastfeeding or breast milk for procedural pain in neonates

Visit

Shah PS, Herbozo C, Aliwalas LL, Shah VS

Shah PS, Herbozo C, Aliwalas LL, Shah VS

Breastfeeding provides pain relief for newborn babies undergoing painful procedures. Medicine for pain relief is commonly given for major painful procedures, but may not be given for minor painful procedures such as blood sampling (by heel prick orvenepun

Cochrane Summary: Venepuncture versus heel lance for blood sampling in term neonates  (2011)

Cochrane Summary: Venepuncture versus heel lance for blood sampling in term neonates

Visit

Shah V, Ohlsson A

Shah V, Ohlsson A

In most countries, a blood sample from newborn babies is needed forscreeningtests. A heel lance is the standard way of taking blood, but it is a painful procedure with no optimal method of pain relief known. Thisreviewof trials found evidence thatvenepunc

Cochrane Summary: Tissue adhesives for traumatic lacerations in children and adults  (2002)

Cochrane Summary: Tissue adhesives for traumatic lacerations in children and adults

Visit

Farion K, Osmond MH, Hartling L, Russell K, Klassen T, Crumley E, Wiebe N

Farion K, Osmond MH, Hartling L, Russell K, Klassen T, Crumley E, Wiebe N

Cuts (lacerations) often need to be closed to ensure proper healing, and prevent infection or unattractivescarring. Wounds may be closed with stitches (sutures), staples, tapes or glue (tissueadhesive). Thereviewfound that glue is an excellent substitute

Procedural Sedation English (1) French All (1)

Overview of Systematic Reviews: What works and what's safe in pediatric emergency procedural sedation: an overview of reviews  (2016)

Overview of Systematic Reviews: What works and what's safe in pediatric emergency procedural sedation: an overview of reviews

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Hartling L, Milne A, Foisy M, Lang E, Sinclair D, Klassen TP, Evered L

Hartling L, Milne A, Foisy M, Lang E, Sinclair D, Klassen TP, Evered L

This overview of systematic reviews examines the safety and efficacy of sedative agents commonly used for procedural sedation (propofol, ketamine, nitrous oxide, midazolam) in children in the ED or similar settings.

Overview of Systematic Reviews: What works and what's safe in pediatric emergency procedural sedation: an overview of reviews  (2016)

Overview of Systematic Reviews: What works and what's safe in pediatric emergency procedural sedation: an overview of reviews

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Hartling L, Milne A, Foisy M, Lang E, Sinclair D, Klassen TP, Evered L

Hartling L, Milne A, Foisy M, Lang E, Sinclair D, Klassen TP, Evered L

This overview of systematic reviews examines the safety and efficacy of sedative agents commonly used for procedural sedation (propofol, ketamine, nitrous oxide, midazolam) in children in the ED or similar settings.

Sepsis English (2) French All (2)

Cochrane Summary: Intravenous immunoglobulins for treating patients with severe sepsis and septic shock (2013)

Cochrane Summary: Intravenous immunoglobulins for treating patients with severe sepsis and septic shock (2013)

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Alejandria Marissa MLMA, D.; Dans Leonila, F.; Mantaring, I. I. I. Jacinto Blas

Alejandria Marissa MLMA, D.; Dans Leonila, F.; Mantaring, I. I. I. Jacinto Blas

Objective: For this updated Cochrane review, we searched the medical literature databases to January 2012. We included 43 randomized controlled trials (RCTs); 25 were RCTs of polyclonal intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIGs) with 17 in adults (1958 participants) and eight in newborn infants (3831 participants) including a large polyclonal IVIG trial on infants with sepsis that was published in 2011. The remaining 18 trials (a total of 13,413 participants) were of monoclonal antibodies. Published: 2013.

Cochrane Summary: Human recombinant activated protein C for severe sepsis and septic shock in adult and paediatric patients (2012)

Cochrane Summary: Human recombinant activated protein C for severe sepsis and septic shock in adult and paediatric patients (2012)

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Mart-Carvajal Arturo JS, Ivan; Gluud, Christian; Lathyris, Dimitrios; Cardona Andrs, Felipe

Mart-Carvajal Arturo JS, Ivan; Gluud, Christian; Lathyris, Dimitrios; Cardona...

Objective: In this updated Cochrane review we searched the databases until June 2012. We included six randomized clinical trials which involved 6781 people (6307 adult and 474 paediatric participants) with either a high or low risk of death. All trials had high risk of bias and were sponsored by the pharmaceutical industry (Eli Lilly). moreover, there is an increased risk of bleeding associated with its use. Published: 2012.

Cochrane Summary: Intravenous immunoglobulins for treating patients with severe sepsis and septic shock (2013)

Cochrane Summary: Intravenous immunoglobulins for treating patients with severe sepsis and septic shock (2013)

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Alejandria Marissa MLMA, D.; Dans Leonila, F.; Mantaring, I. I. I. Jacinto Blas

Alejandria Marissa MLMA, D.; Dans Leonila, F.; Mantaring, I. I. I. Jacinto Blas

Objective: For this updated Cochrane review, we searched the medical literature databases to January 2012. We included 43 randomized controlled trials (RCTs); 25 were RCTs of polyclonal intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIGs) with 17 in adults (1958 participants) and eight in newborn infants (3831 participants) including a large polyclonal IVIG trial on infants with sepsis that was published in 2011. The remaining 18 trials (a total of 13,413 participants) were of monoclonal antibodies. Published: 2013.

Cochrane Summary: Human recombinant activated protein C for severe sepsis and septic shock in adult and paediatric patients (2012)

Cochrane Summary: Human recombinant activated protein C for severe sepsis and septic shock in adult and paediatric patients (2012)

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Mart-Carvajal Arturo JS, Ivan; Gluud, Christian; Lathyris, Dimitrios; Cardona Andrs, Felipe

Mart-Carvajal Arturo JS, Ivan; Gluud, Christian; Lathyris, Dimitrios; Cardona...

Objective: In this updated Cochrane review we searched the databases until June 2012. We included six randomized clinical trials which involved 6781 people (6307 adult and 474 paediatric participants) with either a high or low risk of death. All trials had high risk of bias and were sponsored by the pharmaceutical industry (Eli Lilly). moreover, there is an increased risk of bleeding associated with its use. Published: 2012.

Status Epilepticus English (2) French All (2)

BMJ Clinical Review: Febrile seizures  (2015)

BMJ Clinical Review: Febrile seizures

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Patel N, Ram D, Swiderska N, Mewasingh LD, Newton RW, Offringa M

Patel N, Ram D, Swiderska N, Mewasingh LD, Newton RW, Offringa M

This review aims to summarise how to recognise a febrile seizure and rule out other underlying causes, how to manage febrile seizures and how to deal with common questions posed by parents in this situation.

Review: Evaluation and Management of Pediatric Febrile Seizures in the Emergency Department  (2011)

Review: Evaluation and Management of Pediatric Febrile Seizures in the Emergency Department

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Hampers LC, Spina LA

Hampers LC, Spina LA

This review describes the differences between simple and complex febrile seizures in pediatric patients. The document provides an overview of clinical assessment, laboratory testing, imaging and discharge instructions.

BMJ Clinical Review: Febrile seizures  (2015)

BMJ Clinical Review: Febrile seizures

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Patel N, Ram D, Swiderska N, Mewasingh LD, Newton RW, Offringa M

Patel N, Ram D, Swiderska N, Mewasingh LD, Newton RW, Offringa M

This review aims to summarise how to recognise a febrile seizure and rule out other underlying causes, how to manage febrile seizures and how to deal with common questions posed by parents in this situation.

Review: Evaluation and Management of Pediatric Febrile Seizures in the Emergency Department  (2011)

Review: Evaluation and Management of Pediatric Febrile Seizures in the Emergency Department

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Hampers LC, Spina LA

Hampers LC, Spina LA

This review describes the differences between simple and complex febrile seizures in pediatric patients. The document provides an overview of clinical assessment, laboratory testing, imaging and discharge instructions.

Suspected Physical Child Maltreatment English (2) French All (2)

Overview of Systematic Reviews: Systematic reviews of bruising in relation to child abuse-what have we learnt: an overview of review updates  (2013)

Overview of Systematic Reviews: Systematic reviews of bruising in relation to child abuse-what have we learnt: an overview of review updates

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Maguire S, Mann M

Maguire S, Mann M

This overview examined systematic review evidence to answer the questions: can you age bruises accurately in children, and are there patterns of bruising in childhood which are either diagnostic or suggestive of abuse?

Overview of Systematic Reviews: What does the recent literature add to the identification and investigation of fractures in child abuse: an overview of review updates 2005-2013  (2013)

Overview of Systematic Reviews: What does the recent literature add to the identification and investigation of fractures in child abuse: an overview of review updates 2005-2013

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Maguire S, Cowley L, Mann M, Kemp A

Maguire S, Cowley L, Mann M, Kemp A

Objective: To identify additional studies that contribute to the evidence on distinguishing which fractures are indicative of abuse and optimizing the identification of occult fractures.

Overview of Systematic Reviews: Systematic reviews of bruising in relation to child abuse-what have we learnt: an overview of review updates  (2013)

Overview of Systematic Reviews: Systematic reviews of bruising in relation to child abuse-what have we learnt: an overview of review updates

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Maguire S, Mann M

Maguire S, Mann M

This overview examined systematic review evidence to answer the questions: can you age bruises accurately in children, and are there patterns of bruising in childhood which are either diagnostic or suggestive of abuse?

Overview of Systematic Reviews: What does the recent literature add to the identification and investigation of fractures in child abuse: an overview of review updates 2005-2013  (2013)

Overview of Systematic Reviews: What does the recent literature add to the identification and investigation of fractures in child abuse: an overview of review updates 2005-2013

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Maguire S, Cowley L, Mann M, Kemp A

Maguire S, Cowley L, Mann M, Kemp A

Objective: To identify additional studies that contribute to the evidence on distinguishing which fractures are indicative of abuse and optimizing the identification of occult fractures.

Thoracoabdominal Trauma English (2) French All (2)

Treatment of severe blunt pancreatic lesions in children  (2014)

Treatment of severe blunt pancreatic lesions in children

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Haugaard MV, Wettergren A, Hillings JG, Gluud C, Penninga L,

Haugaard MV, Wettergren A, Hillings JG, Gluud C, Penninga L,

This review shows that strategies regarding non-operative versus operative treatment of severe blunt pancreatic trauma in children are not based on randomised clinical trials.

Should prophylactic antibiotics be used in patients with penetrating abdominal trauma?  (2013)

Should prophylactic antibiotics be used in patients with penetrating abdominal trauma?

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Brand M, Grieve A,

Brand M, Grieve A,

No randomised controlled trials could be found that met the inclusion criteria for this review.

Treatment of severe blunt pancreatic lesions in children  (2014)

Treatment of severe blunt pancreatic lesions in children

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Haugaard MV, Wettergren A, Hillings JG, Gluud C, Penninga L,

Haugaard MV, Wettergren A, Hillings JG, Gluud C, Penninga L,

This review shows that strategies regarding non-operative versus operative treatment of severe blunt pancreatic trauma in children are not based on randomised clinical trials.

Should prophylactic antibiotics be used in patients with penetrating abdominal trauma?  (2013)

Should prophylactic antibiotics be used in patients with penetrating abdominal trauma?

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Brand M, Grieve A,

Brand M, Grieve A,

No randomised controlled trials could be found that met the inclusion criteria for this review.

Upper Extremity Fractures English (2) French All (2)

Cochrane Summary: Conservative interventions for shaft fractures of the forearm bones in children  (2013)

Cochrane Summary: Conservative interventions for shaft fractures of the forearm bones in children

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Madhuri V, Dutt V, Gahukamble AD, Tharyan P

Madhuri V, Dutt V, Gahukamble AD, Tharyan P

The forearm consists of two bones, the radius and the ulna. Fractures (broken bones) in the middle portion (shaft) of one or both of these bones are common injuries in children. Most of these fractures are treated conservatively (i.e. without surgery). Conservative treatment usually involves gently putting the broken bone back into place (reduction). Part of the arm is then put in a cast to protect and support the broken bones while they heal. There are different ways of immobilising the injured arm. For example, some casts include the elbow whereas others do not. When casts include the elbow, the elbow may be in a bent or extended position. While these fractures usually heal, the results are not always satisfactory and sometimes there are complications. This review aimed to find out which conservative treatment methods give the best results for children with these fractures by looking at the evidence from randomised controlled trials comparing different conservative interventions. While we found two completed trials, both were published only in conference abstracts that failed to provide any usable data. We also found two ongoing trials. In all, the review found no evidence from randomised trials to inform on the best ways to treat these fractures.

Cochrane Summary: Surgical treatment for forearm fractures in children (fractures involving the shafts of the radius and ulna)  (2011)

Cochrane Summary: Surgical treatment for forearm fractures in children (fractures involving the shafts of the radius and ulna)

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Abraham A, Kumar S, Chaudhry S, Ibrahim T

Abraham A, Kumar S, Chaudhry S, Ibrahim T

Fractures of the shafts of the forearm bones in children are common injuries and occur after a fall on an outstretched hand. There are two bones in the forearm: the radius and the ulna. After a fall either one or both bones may fracture. The shape of forearm bones are important for the twisting motion of the hand, such as in receiving change from a shop keeper with an open palm (supination) or turning a key in a door (turning the palm facing down - pronation). Treatment of the forearm fracture aims to restore the shape of the bones such that supination and pronation ability is restored. The first stage of treatment involves manipulating (setting) the bones to the correct shape. This is usually done under anaesthesia. The second stage involves stabilising the fractured bones either with a plaster cast (conservative treatment) or metal implants (surgical treatment). This review aimed to examine the evidence from randomised controlled trials comparing conservative versus surgical methods and trials comparing different surgical methods for treatment of these fractures. We hoped to find which are the best methods in terms of function and complications. In spite of a thorough search we found no evidence from properly conducted studies to help inform decisions on treatment of these fractures.

Cochrane Summary: Conservative interventions for shaft fractures of the forearm bones in children  (2013)

Cochrane Summary: Conservative interventions for shaft fractures of the forearm bones in children

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Madhuri V, Dutt V, Gahukamble AD, Tharyan P

Madhuri V, Dutt V, Gahukamble AD, Tharyan P

The forearm consists of two bones, the radius and the ulna. Fractures (broken bones) in the middle portion (shaft) of one or both of these bones are common injuries in children. Most of these fractures are treated conservatively (i.e. without surgery). Conservative treatment usually involves gently putting the broken bone back into place (reduction). Part of the arm is then put in a cast to protect and support the broken bones while they heal. There are different ways of immobilising the injured arm. For example, some casts include the elbow whereas others do not. When casts include the elbow, the elbow may be in a bent or extended position. While these fractures usually heal, the results are not always satisfactory and sometimes there are complications. This review aimed to find out which conservative treatment methods give the best results for children with these fractures by looking at the evidence from randomised controlled trials comparing different conservative interventions. While we found two completed trials, both were published only in conference abstracts that failed to provide any usable data. We also found two ongoing trials. In all, the review found no evidence from randomised trials to inform on the best ways to treat these fractures.

Cochrane Summary: Surgical treatment for forearm fractures in children (fractures involving the shafts of the radius and ulna)  (2011)

Cochrane Summary: Surgical treatment for forearm fractures in children (fractures involving the shafts of the radius and ulna)

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Abraham A, Kumar S, Chaudhry S, Ibrahim T

Abraham A, Kumar S, Chaudhry S, Ibrahim T

Fractures of the shafts of the forearm bones in children are common injuries and occur after a fall on an outstretched hand. There are two bones in the forearm: the radius and the ulna. After a fall either one or both bones may fracture. The shape of forearm bones are important for the twisting motion of the hand, such as in receiving change from a shop keeper with an open palm (supination) or turning a key in a door (turning the palm facing down - pronation). Treatment of the forearm fracture aims to restore the shape of the bones such that supination and pronation ability is restored. The first stage of treatment involves manipulating (setting) the bones to the correct shape. This is usually done under anaesthesia. The second stage involves stabilising the fractured bones either with a plaster cast (conservative treatment) or metal implants (surgical treatment). This review aimed to examine the evidence from randomised controlled trials comparing conservative versus surgical methods and trials comparing different surgical methods for treatment of these fractures. We hoped to find which are the best methods in terms of function and complications. In spite of a thorough search we found no evidence from properly conducted studies to help inform decisions on treatment of these fractures.