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Fever 3 months to 12 years

Fever 3 months to 12 years clinical pathways or guideline

BROWSE INFORMATION REPOSITORY
Clinical guidelines 

Fever and temperature taking  (2020)

Fever and temperature taking

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Canadian Pediatric Society

Canadian Pediatric Society

Guidelines for the symptomatic management of fever in children: systematic review of the literature and quality appraisal with AGREE II.  (2017)

Guidelines for the symptomatic management of fever in children: systematic review of the literature and quality appraisal with AGREE II.

Visit

Chiappini E, Bortone B, Galli L, de Martino M.

Chiappini E, Bortone B, Galli L, de Martino M.

To identify and evaluate guidelines for the symptomatic management of fever in children.

2016 Update of the Italian Pediatric Society Guidelines for Management of Fever in Children  (2016)

2016 Update of the Italian Pediatric Society Guidelines for Management of Fever in Children

Visit

Chiappini E, Venturini E, Remaschi G, Principi N, Longhi R, Tovo PA, et al.

Chiappini E, Venturini E, Remaschi G, Principi N, Longhi R, Tovo PA, et al.

To review new scientific evidence to update the Italian guidelines for managing fever in children as drafted by the panel of the Italian Pediatric Society.

ACR Appropriateness Criteria Fever Without Source or Unknown Origin-Child.  (2016)

ACR Appropriateness Criteria Fever Without Source or Unknown Origin-Child.

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Expert Panel on Pediatric Imaging, Westra SJ, Karmazyn BK, Alazraki AL, Dempsey ME, Dillman JR, Garber M, et al.

Expert Panel on Pediatric Imaging, Westra SJ, Karmazyn BK, Alazraki AL, Demps...

The cause of fever in a child can often be determined from history, physical examination, and laboratory tests; infections account for the majority of cases. Yet in 20%, no apparent cause can be found, designated as fever without source (FWS). The yield of chest radiography in children with FWS is low, and it is usually not appropriate. However, in children with respiratory signs, high fever (>39C), or marked leukocytosis (20,000/mm(3)), chest radiography is usually appropriate, as it has a higher yield in detecting clinically occult pneumonia. In newborns with FWS, there is higher risk for serious bacterial infection, and the routine use of chest radiography is controversial. In children with neutropenia, fever is a major concern. In some clinical circumstances, such as after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, chest CT scan may be appropriate even if the results of chest radiography are negative or nonspecific, as it has higher sensitivity and can demonstrate specific findings (such as lung nodule and "halo sign") that can guide management. In a child with prolonged fever of unknown origin despite extensive medical workup (fever of unknown origin), diagnosis is usually dependent on clinical and laboratory studies, and imaging tests have low yield. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel.

NICE guideline: feverish illness in children--assessment and initial management in children younger than 5 years.  (2013)

NICE guideline: feverish illness in children--assessment and initial management in children younger than 5 years.

Visit

Davis T.

Davis T.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guideline for feverish illness in children (assessment and initial management in children younger than 5years) was partially updated in May 2013.1 Not all sections were reviewed, but the following were: the signs and symptoms of serious illness; the predictive value of tachycardia; the use of inflammatory markers; and the role of paracetamol and ibuprofen. The aim of the guideline is to optimise the management of young children with fever, and in particular to guide health professionals to recognise the signs of serious infection. The update made new recommendations based on current evidence. This guideline was developed by the National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health. They worked with the Guideline Development Group to review the evidence and write the recommendations.

Fever and temperature taking  (2020)

Fever and temperature taking

Visit

Canadian Pediatric Society

Canadian Pediatric Society

Guidelines for the symptomatic management of fever in children: systematic review of the literature and quality appraisal with AGREE II.  (2017)

Guidelines for the symptomatic management of fever in children: systematic review of the literature and quality appraisal with AGREE II.

Visit

Chiappini E, Bortone B, Galli L, de Martino M.

Chiappini E, Bortone B, Galli L, de Martino M.

To identify and evaluate guidelines for the symptomatic management of fever in children.

2016 Update of the Italian Pediatric Society Guidelines for Management of Fever in Children  (2016)

2016 Update of the Italian Pediatric Society Guidelines for Management of Fever in Children

Visit

Chiappini E, Venturini E, Remaschi G, Principi N, Longhi R, Tovo PA, et al.

Chiappini E, Venturini E, Remaschi G, Principi N, Longhi R, Tovo PA, et al.

To review new scientific evidence to update the Italian guidelines for managing fever in children as drafted by the panel of the Italian Pediatric Society.

ACR Appropriateness Criteria Fever Without Source or Unknown Origin-Child.  (2016)

ACR Appropriateness Criteria Fever Without Source or Unknown Origin-Child.

Visit

Expert Panel on Pediatric Imaging, Westra SJ, Karmazyn BK, Alazraki AL, Dempsey ME, Dillman JR, Garber M, et al.

Expert Panel on Pediatric Imaging, Westra SJ, Karmazyn BK, Alazraki AL, Demps...

The cause of fever in a child can often be determined from history, physical examination, and laboratory tests; infections account for the majority of cases. Yet in 20%, no apparent cause can be found, designated as fever without source (FWS). The yield of chest radiography in children with FWS is low, and it is usually not appropriate. However, in children with respiratory signs, high fever (>39C), or marked leukocytosis (20,000/mm(3)), chest radiography is usually appropriate, as it has a higher yield in detecting clinically occult pneumonia. In newborns with FWS, there is higher risk for serious bacterial infection, and the routine use of chest radiography is controversial. In children with neutropenia, fever is a major concern. In some clinical circumstances, such as after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, chest CT scan may be appropriate even if the results of chest radiography are negative or nonspecific, as it has higher sensitivity and can demonstrate specific findings (such as lung nodule and "halo sign") that can guide management. In a child with prolonged fever of unknown origin despite extensive medical workup (fever of unknown origin), diagnosis is usually dependent on clinical and laboratory studies, and imaging tests have low yield. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel.

NICE guideline: feverish illness in children--assessment and initial management in children younger than 5 years.  (2013)

NICE guideline: feverish illness in children--assessment and initial management in children younger than 5 years.

Visit

Davis T.

Davis T.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guideline for feverish illness in children (assessment and initial management in children younger than 5years) was partially updated in May 2013.1 Not all sections were reviewed, but the following were: the signs and symptoms of serious illness; the predictive value of tachycardia; the use of inflammatory markers; and the role of paracetamol and ibuprofen. The aim of the guideline is to optimise the management of young children with fever, and in particular to guide health professionals to recognise the signs of serious infection. The update made new recommendations based on current evidence. This guideline was developed by the National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health. They worked with the Guideline Development Group to review the evidence and write the recommendations.