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Les patients et les familles

Our tools for parents and caregivers are based on the latest evidence and cover many common childhood illnesses. These tools are designed to help parents and families care for their sick children at home and understand when to seek medical care. We work with healthcare providers, parents and caregivers from start to finish during our tool development process

The information provided on TREKK.ca is designed to complement, not replace, the relationship between a patient and their own physician or healthcare provider.

Patient and family tools

Caring for kids provides parents with information about their child and teen's health and well-being. The site is developed by the Canadian Pediatric Society.




Associated with the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, this site provides parents, children and first-tier healthcare providers with free, evidence-based information about every day health and complex medical conditions.




Croup is a common respiratory illness caused by a viral infection in the airways. Accompanied by a barky cough and respiratory distress, this illness is most common in children from birth to 6 years of age, peaking at 2 years of age. This storybook is told through the eyes of parents and includes their experiences, health information, and recommendations for parents and families dealing with croup. This eBook was created by ECHO Research (University of Alberta) and ARCHE (University of Alberta) in collaboration with Alberta Health Services Edmonton Zone and the Stollery Children’s Hospital. Funding was provided by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).  




The Canadian Anaphylaxis Action Plan for Kids (Kids’ CAP) is a tool to educate children and caregivers about anaphylaxis. The main focus of this tool is to answer two questions: 1) How to recognize the symptoms of anaphylaxis; 2) What are the appropriate treatment steps of a child experiencing an anaphylactic reaction. The action plan document was developed by a research team at the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) in 2015 and include validated pictograms with written instructions that are easily understood by students at grade 7 and above.




Fevers are the body’s natural response to infection. It can be scary when your child has a fever, but fevers will not hurt your child. This video provides information about how to take your child’s temperature, how to manage their symptoms, and when to seek health care. This video was created through a collaboration between ECHO Research (University of Alberta), TREKK, and ARCHE (University of Alberta). Funding was provided by the Networks of Centres of Excellence and the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation through the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute.




Needle pokes are one of the most common sources of pain for children seeking emergency medical care. Needle pokes may be used during healthcare visits to collect blood, deliver medication and fluids, or to numb certain body parts while stitching, for example. This video provides information about needle pokes and useful tips for parents and families who have a child that may require a needle poke.  This video was created through a collaboration between ECHO Research (University of Alberta), TREKK, and ARCHE (University of Alberta). Funding was provided by the Networks of Centres of Excellence and the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation through the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute.  




Bronchiolitis is a viral infection, commonly caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), that affects the lower part of the lungs. It mainly affects babies and young children under 2 and is very contagious. This video provides information on the symptoms of bronchiolitis, how to manage it at home, and when to seek emergency care. This video was created through a collaboration between ECHO Research (University of Alberta), TREKK, and ARCHE (University of Alberta). Funding was provided by the Networks of Centres of Excellence and the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation through the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute.




In this video Dr. Anthony Crocco (Sketchy EBM) outlines the symptoms of COVID-19, how to protect yourself and your family, what to do to be well and when to worry. This video is not a substitute for medical care. Please consult Public Health or your health professional for medical advice.  




We’ve been hearing a lot about social distancing during the coronavirus outbreak. Now everyone is talking about physical distancing. So, what’s the difference? They basically mean the same thing, but as the coronavirus spreads and infects more people, the restrictions are getting more serious. And we’re being encouraged to find ways to be social, while still staying apart from each other — far apart. For example, you now need to stay two metres away from other people instead of just one. Check out this video to hear the latest.




COVID-19 is creating anxiety for many, children included. Dr. Leslie Roos, a clinical scientist at the Children's Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba, shares how parents can help children remain calm during this time of uncertainty. 




The Emergency Department (ED) is a place where people go for immediate care. Visiting the ED can be scary and overwhelming, especially when you don’t know what to expect. Some hospital procedures have changed due to COVID-19, and we have added specific information related to the COVID-19 pandemic. We hope this infographic helps reduce stress and helps you prepare. This infographic was created through a collaboration between ECHO Research (University of Alberta), ARCHE (University of Alberta), and TREKK. Funding was provided by the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation through the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute. 




Visiting the emergency department (ED) with a child can be overwhelming, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. This video provides information about changes in hospital procedures that can be expected during the pandemic, and the regular steps involved in an ED visit. This video was created through a collaboration between ECHO Research and ARCHE with support from TREKK. Funding was provided by the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation through the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute. 




FoundationLiving Guideline for Pediatric Concussion Care (PedsConcussion)




ECHO Research and ARCHE, research groups from the University of Alberta, have created an informative video for parents, with tips to help families understand common symptoms of asthma, how to manage symptoms at home, and when to seek emergency care.




This infographic provides information about functional constipation’s definition, diagnosis, treatment, and when to take your child to a doctor. 




MyHEARTSMAP is a digital tool that will help families, children and youth self-assess their mental health needs. Once the self-assessment is completed, the tool will recommend appropriate resources. This tool has been found to be highly reliable and can provide options for seeking care other than the emergency department or can provide doctors with valuable information in the ED. View MyHEARTSMAP     




Anaphylaxis is a severe allergic reaction that involves two or more parts of the body and happens quickly. Watch this video to learn how to recognize anaphylaxis and what can help mange your child's anaphylaxis.




Asthma is a common condition that causes airways to swell and fill with mucus. This can make it hard to breathe. Asthma can be caused by genetics or the environment. Asthma is long-lasting, but there are ways to help keep your child’s asthma under control. 




A concussion is a brain injury. Any child or teen who gets hit in the head, face, neck, or body has a chance of getting a concussion. Concussions can happen to anyone from falling, during sports, or car accidents.




Gastroenteritis, or the stomach flu, is an infection of the intestines caused by a virus or bacteria that can cause diarrhea and vomiting. It is common in infants and children and can lead to dehydration. This video was developed by ECHO, ARCHE, and TREKK.




An anaphylactic reaction, or anaphylaxis, is a severe allergic reaction. Symptoms can start very quickly and it could be life-threatening.    Anaphylaxis is caused by an allergen that triggers an immune response in the body. This is your body’s way of trying to protect itself. Common allergens include food, some insects (like bees or wasps), and medications.




This video is presented in Arabic. A febrile seizure is a convulsion accompanied by a fever or illness. The child usually has muscle twitching, jerking or stiffness for a few minutes. The child usually loses consciousness and it is common for the child’s eyes to roll upward. Most children are sleepy afterward and are not responsive to your voice. Febrile seizures are common. Between 2-5% of children will have at least one febrile seizure when they are between 6 months and 5 years old. This video will help you to understand what is happening to your child and will help prepare you for your medical visit.




Learn more about Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease. This video is in Arabic.




This video is presented in Arabic. When children have a painful or anxiety provoking procedure such as straightening a broken arm, putting in stitches or performing invasive procedures, your child may need to have a procedural sedation. This video will help you learn the steps involved in a procedural sedation and will give you an idea of what to expect once you bring your child home.




Learn more about Procedural Sedation. This video is presented in Arabic. When children have a painful or anxiety provoking procedure such as straightening a broken arm, putting in stitches or performing invasive procedures, your child may need to have a procedural sedation. This video will help you learn the steps involved in a procedural sedation and will give you an idea of what to expect once you bring your child home.




A febrile seizure is a convulsion accompanied by a fever or illness. The child usually has muscle twitching, jerking or stiffness for a few minutes. The child usually loses consciousness and it is common for the child’s eyes to roll upward. Most children are sleepy afterward and are not responsive to your voice. Febrile seizures are common. Between 2-5% of children will have at least one febrile seizure when they are between 6 months and 5 years old. This video will help you to understand what is happening to your child and will help prepare you for your medical visit.




Hand-foot-mouth disease or coxsackie is a common viral illness that most children get at some point that can cause symptoms including fever, rash, spots in the mouth and decreased feeding. This short video will help you to understand what to expect when your child has coxsackie and how you can care for them.




When children have a painful or anxiety provoking procedure such as straightening a broken arm, putting in stitches or performing invasive procedures, your child may need to have a procedural sedation. This video will help you learn the steps involved in a procedural sedation and will give you an idea of what to expect once you bring your child home.




When children have a painful or anxiety provoking procedure such as straightening a broken arm, putting in stitches or performing invasive procedures, your child may need to have a procedural sedation. This video will help you learn the steps involved in a procedural sedation and will give you an idea of what to expect once you bring your child home.




A febrile seizure is a convulsion accompanied by a fever or illness. The child usually has muscle twitching, jerking or stiffness for a few minutes. The child usually loses consciousness and it is common for the child’s eyes to roll upward. Most children are sleepy afterward and are not responsive to your voice. Febrile seizures are common. Between 2-5% of children will have at least one febrile seizure when they are between 6 months and 5 years old. This video will help you to understand what is happening to your child and will help prepare you for your medical visit.




Hand-foot-mouth disease or coxsackie is a common viral illness that most children get at some point that can cause symptoms including fever, rash, spots in the mouth and decreased feeding. This short video will help you to understand what to expect when your child has coxsackie and how you can care for them.




When children have a painful or anxiety provoking procedure such as straightening a broken arm, putting in stitches or performing invasive procedures, your child may need to have a procedural sedation. This video will help you learn the steps involved in a procedural sedation and will give you an idea of what to expect once you bring your child home.




When children have a painful or anxiety provoking procedure such as straightening a broken arm, putting in stitches or performing invasive procedures, your child may need to have a procedural sedation. This video will help you learn the steps involved in a procedural sedation and will give you an idea of what to expect once you bring your child home.




A febrile seizure is a convulsion accompanied by a fever or illness. The child usually has muscle twitching, jerking or stiffness for a few minutes. The child usually loses consciousness and it is common for the child’s eyes to roll upward. Most children are sleepy afterward and are not responsive to your voice. Febrile seizures are common. Between 2-5% of children will have at least one febrile seizure when they are between 6 months and 5 years old. This video will help you to understand what is happening to your child and will help prepare you for your medical visit.




Hand-foot-mouth disease or coxsackie is a common viral illness that most children get at some point that can cause symptoms including fever, rash, spots in the mouth and decreased feeding. This short video will help you to understand what to expect when your child has coxsackie and how you can care for them.




When children have a painful or anxiety provoking procedure such as straightening a broken arm, putting in stitches or performing invasive procedures, your child may need to have a procedural sedation. This video will help you learn the steps involved in a procedural sedation and will give you an idea of what to expect once you bring your child home.




When children have a painful or anxiety provoking procedure such as straightening a broken arm, putting in stitches or performing invasive procedures, your child may need to have a procedural sedation. This video will help you learn the steps involved in a procedural sedation and will give you an idea of what to expect once you bring your child home.




This infographic provides an overview of what chronic pain is, the healthcare providers that can help your child manage their pain, and tips on how to manage chronic pain in children, and where to find a chronic pain clinic in Canada.




The ECHO research program is focused on improving health outcomes for children with acute health conditions through the application of the best available evidence — a process known as knowledge translation (KT).




Acute otitis media (or middle ear infections)  are infections caused by viruses or bacteria, and are very common in children. This infographic provides useful information for parents and families with a child who has an ear infection. Browse through to learn about common symptoms, how to manage symptoms, and when to seek care.   This infographic was created through a collaboration between ECHO Research (University of Alberta), TREKK, and ARCHE (University of Alberta). Funding was provided by the Networks of Centres of Excellence and the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation through the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute.




Acute otitis media (or middle ear infections) are infections caused by viruses or bacteria and are very common in children. This video provides useful information for parents and families about symptoms, how to manage symptoms, and when to seek care for a child who has an ear infection. This video was created through a collaboration between ECHO Research (University of Alberta), TREKK, and ARCHE (University of Alberta). Funding was provided by the Networks of Centres of Excellence and the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation through the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute.




Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a bacterial infection of the urinary tract (kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra). They can occur at any stage of life and symptoms may be different depending on your child’s age. This video provides information about symptoms, when to seek medical care, and how to manage and prevent UTIs in children. This video was created through a collaboration between ECHO Research (University of Alberta), TREKK, and ARCHE (University of Alberta). Funding was provided by the Networks of Centres of Excellence and the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation through the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute.




Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a bacterial infection of the urinary tract (kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra). They can occur at any stage of life and symptoms may be different depending on your child’s age. This interactive infographic provides information about symptoms, when to seek medical care, and how to manage and prevent UTIs in children. This infographic was created through a collaboration between ECHO Research (University of Alberta), TREKK, and ARCHE (University of Alberta). Funding was provided by the Networks of Centres of Excellence and the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation through the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute.




To help parents interact constructively with their children during this time of confinement, the World Health Organization created these six one-page tips for parents cover planning one-on-one time, staying positive, creating a daily routine, avoiding bad behaviour, managing stress, and talking about COVID-19.     




Croup is a common respiratory illness caused by a viral infection in the airways. Accompanied by a barky cough and respiratory distress, this illness is most common in children from birth to 6 years of age, peaking at 2 years of age. This storybook is told through the eyes of parents and includes their experiences, health information, and recommendations for parents and families dealing with croup. This eBook was created by ECHO Research (University of Alberta) and ARCHE (University of Alberta) in collaboration with Alberta Health Services Edmonton Zone and the Stollery Children’s Hospital. Funding was provided by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).  




Croup is a common respiratory illness caused by a viral infection in the airways. Accompanied by a barky cough and respiratory distress, this illness is most common in children from birth to 6 years of age, peaking at 2 years of age. Browse through this interactive eBook for information on the signs, symptoms, treatment, and management of croup and what to do if you are a parent or family dealing with croup. This eBook was created through a collaboration between ECHO Research (University of Alberta), TREKK, and ARCHE (University of Alberta). Funding was provided by the Network of Centres of Excellence of Canada (NCE).




Croup is a common respiratory illness caused by a viral infection in the airways. Accompanied by a barky cough and respiratory distress, this illness is most common in children from birth to 6 years of age, peaking at 2 years of age. This is a short, animated video about signs and symptoms of croup, and what to do if you are a parent or a family dealing with a child who has croup. This video was created through a collaboration between ECHO Research (University of Alberta), TREKK, and ARCHE (University of Alberta). Funding was provided by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).




This eBook follows a teenager and her family's experiences dealing with chronic pain, sharing the struggle to achieve daily activities and how the family learned to cope with and manage her pain. This eBook and associated breathing exercises were created through a collaboration between ECHO Research (University of Alberta), the Stollery Children's Hospital Foundation, and the Women and Children's Health Research Institute. Funding was provided by the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation through the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute.




Gastroenteritis is an infection of the bowel (intestines) caused by a virus or bacteria that can cause diarrhea and vomiting. It is common in infants and children and can lead to dehydration. Browse through this eBook for information on the signs, symptoms, treatment, and management of gastroenteritis and what to do if you are a parent or family dealing with gastroenteritis. This eBook was created by ECHO Research (University of Alberta), ARCHE (University of Alberta), and TREKK. Funding was provided by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR). 




Needle pokes are one of the most common sources of pain for children seeking emergency medical care. Needle pokes may be used during healthcare visits to collect blood, deliver medication and fluids, or to numb certain body parts while stitching, for example. This interactive infographic provides useful age-specific tips for parents and families who have a child that may require a needle poke. This infographic was created through a collaboration between ECHO Research (University of Alberta), TREKK, and ARCHE (University of Alberta). Funding was provided by the Networks of Centres of Excellence and the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation through the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute.




Fevers are the body’s natural response to infection. It can be scary when your child has a fever, but fevers will not hurt your child. This infographic provides information about how to take your child’s temperature, how to manage their symptoms, and when to seek medical care. This infographic was created through a collaboration between ECHO Research (University of Alberta), TREKK, and ARCHE (University of Alberta). Funding was provided by the Networks of Centres of Excellence and the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation through the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute.




Bronchiolitis is a viral infection, commonly caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), that affects the lower part of the lungs. It mainly affects babies and young children under 2 and is very contagious. This eBook provides information on the symptoms of bronchiolitis, how to manage it at home, and when to seek emergency care. This eBook was created through a collaboration between ECHO Research (University of Alberta), TREKK, and ARCHE (University of Alberta). Funding was provided by the Networks of Centres of Excellence and the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation through the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute.




Looking for resources to understand the scientific realities of the COVID-19 virus and pandemic? Check out this children's science magazine, No Mercy for the Coronas, an engaging and accessible illustrated resource for kids (and parents!) to better understand viruses like COVID-19. This e-magazine was created by La Liberté and POP Comm, and developed with the participation of scientists and researchers at Children’s Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba (CHRIM), University of Manitoba and St. Boniface Hospital Albrechtsen Research Centre’s Youth BIOlab Jeunesse.No Mercy for the Coronas! is for all those who wish to offer children a scientifically reliable resource during this global health crisis affecting all ages and all aspects of society. You can read or download this free magazine in English or French.




RECOVER (Resources on Concussion in a Virtual Environment) was a study being conducted by researchers at Alberta Health Services, the University of Calgary and the University of Alberta. To improve outcomes for children with concussion who are seen in emergency departments, the study developed tools to help physicians and nurses provide better care and to help families to learn more about, assess, and monitor concussion.




Welcome to the HEAL (Health Education and Learning) program, a resource aimed at providing families across Alberta easily accessible, reliable information about common minor illness and injuries in children. The content provided in the HEAL program comes directly from the Pediatric Emergency Medicine experts at the Alberta Children’s Hospital and Stollery Children’s Hospital. While children with coughs, fever, ear pain, vomiting, diarrhea, minor head injuries or nosebleeds can feel very uncomfortable, they are most often safely and best cared for in their own home; the majority of these illnesses and injuries do not require a visit to the Emergency Department.




Being the parent of a child with life-threatening food allergies can be challenging. Visit the Children's Allergy and Asthma Education Resource Centre to view a series of videos that provide parent's views on life with a food allergy (accessed online: March 2017).




Prepared by the Pediatric Section of the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians (CAEP) and the National Emergency Nurses Association (NENA), this resource highlights 10 tips to keep families safe and prepared for an emergency.




PLAN D'ACTION CANADIEN POUR L1ANAPHYLAXIE POUR LES ENFANTS- French




Bronchiolitis is a viral infection, commonly caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), that affects the lower part of the lungs. It mainly affects babies and young children under 2 and is very contagious. This infographic provides information on the symptoms of bronchiolitis, how to manage it at home, and when to seek emergency care. This infographic was created through a collaboration between ECHO Research (University of Alberta), TREKK, and ARCHE (University of Alberta). Funding was provided by the Networks of Centres of Excellence and the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation through the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute.




Croup is a common respiratory illness caused by a viral infection in the airways. Accompanied by a barky cough and respiratory distress, this illness is most common in children from birth to 6 years of age, peaking at 2 years of age. This storybook is told through the eyes of parents and includes their experiences, health information, and recommendations for parents and families dealing with croup. This eBook was created by ECHO Research (University of Alberta) and ARCHE (University of Alberta) in collaboration with Alberta Health Services Edmonton Zone and the Stollery Children’s Hospital. Funding was provided by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).  




Parachute is a Canadian, charitable organization dedicated to preventing injuries and saving lives. Their focus is on prevention, specifically related to motor vehicle collisions, sports and recreation and seniors' falls.




Caring for kids provides parents with information about their child and teen's health and well-being. The site is developed by the Canadian Pediatric Society.




Associated with the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, this site provides parents, children and first-tier healthcare providers with free, evidence-based information about every day health and complex medical conditions.




Croup is a common respiratory illness caused by a viral infection in the airways. Accompanied by a barky cough and respiratory distress, this illness is most common in children from birth to 6 years of age, peaking at 2 years of age. This storybook is told through the eyes of parents and includes their experiences, health information, and recommendations for parents and families dealing with croup. This eBook was created by ECHO Research (University of Alberta) and ARCHE (University of Alberta) in collaboration with Alberta Health Services Edmonton Zone and the Stollery Children’s Hospital. Funding was provided by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).  




The Canadian Anaphylaxis Action Plan for Kids (Kids’ CAP) is a tool to educate children and caregivers about anaphylaxis. The main focus of this tool is to answer two questions: 1) How to recognize the symptoms of anaphylaxis; 2) What are the appropriate treatment steps of a child experiencing an anaphylactic reaction. The action plan document was developed by a research team at the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) in 2015 and include validated pictograms with written instructions that are easily understood by students at grade 7 and above.




Fevers are the body’s natural response to infection. It can be scary when your child has a fever, but fevers will not hurt your child. This video provides information about how to take your child’s temperature, how to manage their symptoms, and when to seek health care. This video was created through a collaboration between ECHO Research (University of Alberta), TREKK, and ARCHE (University of Alberta). Funding was provided by the Networks of Centres of Excellence and the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation through the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute.




Needle pokes are one of the most common sources of pain for children seeking emergency medical care. Needle pokes may be used during healthcare visits to collect blood, deliver medication and fluids, or to numb certain body parts while stitching, for example. This video provides information about needle pokes and useful tips for parents and families who have a child that may require a needle poke.  This video was created through a collaboration between ECHO Research (University of Alberta), TREKK, and ARCHE (University of Alberta). Funding was provided by the Networks of Centres of Excellence and the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation through the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute.  




Bronchiolitis is a viral infection, commonly caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), that affects the lower part of the lungs. It mainly affects babies and young children under 2 and is very contagious. This video provides information on the symptoms of bronchiolitis, how to manage it at home, and when to seek emergency care. This video was created through a collaboration between ECHO Research (University of Alberta), TREKK, and ARCHE (University of Alberta). Funding was provided by the Networks of Centres of Excellence and the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation through the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute.




In this video Dr. Anthony Crocco (Sketchy EBM) outlines the symptoms of COVID-19, how to protect yourself and your family, what to do to be well and when to worry. This video is not a substitute for medical care. Please consult Public Health or your health professional for medical advice.  




We’ve been hearing a lot about social distancing during the coronavirus outbreak. Now everyone is talking about physical distancing. So, what’s the difference? They basically mean the same thing, but as the coronavirus spreads and infects more people, the restrictions are getting more serious. And we’re being encouraged to find ways to be social, while still staying apart from each other — far apart. For example, you now need to stay two metres away from other people instead of just one. Check out this video to hear the latest.




COVID-19 is creating anxiety for many, children included. Dr. Leslie Roos, a clinical scientist at the Children's Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba, shares how parents can help children remain calm during this time of uncertainty. 




The Emergency Department (ED) is a place where people go for immediate care. Visiting the ED can be scary and overwhelming, especially when you don’t know what to expect. Some hospital procedures have changed due to COVID-19, and we have added specific information related to the COVID-19 pandemic. We hope this infographic helps reduce stress and helps you prepare. This infographic was created through a collaboration between ECHO Research (University of Alberta), ARCHE (University of Alberta), and TREKK. Funding was provided by the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation through the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute. 




Visiting the emergency department (ED) with a child can be overwhelming, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. This video provides information about changes in hospital procedures that can be expected during the pandemic, and the regular steps involved in an ED visit. This video was created through a collaboration between ECHO Research and ARCHE with support from TREKK. Funding was provided by the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation through the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute. 




FoundationLiving Guideline for Pediatric Concussion Care (PedsConcussion)




ECHO Research and ARCHE, research groups from the University of Alberta, have created an informative video for parents, with tips to help families understand common symptoms of asthma, how to manage symptoms at home, and when to seek emergency care.




This infographic provides information about functional constipation’s definition, diagnosis, treatment, and when to take your child to a doctor. 




MyHEARTSMAP is a digital tool that will help families, children and youth self-assess their mental health needs. Once the self-assessment is completed, the tool will recommend appropriate resources. This tool has been found to be highly reliable and can provide options for seeking care other than the emergency department or can provide doctors with valuable information in the ED. View MyHEARTSMAP     




Anaphylaxis is a severe allergic reaction that involves two or more parts of the body and happens quickly. Watch this video to learn how to recognize anaphylaxis and what can help mange your child's anaphylaxis.




Asthma is a common condition that causes airways to swell and fill with mucus. This can make it hard to breathe. Asthma can be caused by genetics or the environment. Asthma is long-lasting, but there are ways to help keep your child’s asthma under control. 




A concussion is a brain injury. Any child or teen who gets hit in the head, face, neck, or body has a chance of getting a concussion. Concussions can happen to anyone from falling, during sports, or car accidents.




Gastroenteritis, or the stomach flu, is an infection of the intestines caused by a virus or bacteria that can cause diarrhea and vomiting. It is common in infants and children and can lead to dehydration. This video was developed by ECHO, ARCHE, and TREKK.




An anaphylactic reaction, or anaphylaxis, is a severe allergic reaction. Symptoms can start very quickly and it could be life-threatening.    Anaphylaxis is caused by an allergen that triggers an immune response in the body. This is your body’s way of trying to protect itself. Common allergens include food, some insects (like bees or wasps), and medications.




This video is presented in Arabic. A febrile seizure is a convulsion accompanied by a fever or illness. The child usually has muscle twitching, jerking or stiffness for a few minutes. The child usually loses consciousness and it is common for the child’s eyes to roll upward. Most children are sleepy afterward and are not responsive to your voice. Febrile seizures are common. Between 2-5% of children will have at least one febrile seizure when they are between 6 months and 5 years old. This video will help you to understand what is happening to your child and will help prepare you for your medical visit.




Learn more about Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease. This video is in Arabic.




This video is presented in Arabic. When children have a painful or anxiety provoking procedure such as straightening a broken arm, putting in stitches or performing invasive procedures, your child may need to have a procedural sedation. This video will help you learn the steps involved in a procedural sedation and will give you an idea of what to expect once you bring your child home.




Learn more about Procedural Sedation. This video is presented in Arabic. When children have a painful or anxiety provoking procedure such as straightening a broken arm, putting in stitches or performing invasive procedures, your child may need to have a procedural sedation. This video will help you learn the steps involved in a procedural sedation and will give you an idea of what to expect once you bring your child home.




A febrile seizure is a convulsion accompanied by a fever or illness. The child usually has muscle twitching, jerking or stiffness for a few minutes. The child usually loses consciousness and it is common for the child’s eyes to roll upward. Most children are sleepy afterward and are not responsive to your voice. Febrile seizures are common. Between 2-5% of children will have at least one febrile seizure when they are between 6 months and 5 years old. This video will help you to understand what is happening to your child and will help prepare you for your medical visit.




Hand-foot-mouth disease or coxsackie is a common viral illness that most children get at some point that can cause symptoms including fever, rash, spots in the mouth and decreased feeding. This short video will help you to understand what to expect when your child has coxsackie and how you can care for them.




When children have a painful or anxiety provoking procedure such as straightening a broken arm, putting in stitches or performing invasive procedures, your child may need to have a procedural sedation. This video will help you learn the steps involved in a procedural sedation and will give you an idea of what to expect once you bring your child home.




When children have a painful or anxiety provoking procedure such as straightening a broken arm, putting in stitches or performing invasive procedures, your child may need to have a procedural sedation. This video will help you learn the steps involved in a procedural sedation and will give you an idea of what to expect once you bring your child home.




A febrile seizure is a convulsion accompanied by a fever or illness. The child usually has muscle twitching, jerking or stiffness for a few minutes. The child usually loses consciousness and it is common for the child’s eyes to roll upward. Most children are sleepy afterward and are not responsive to your voice. Febrile seizures are common. Between 2-5% of children will have at least one febrile seizure when they are between 6 months and 5 years old. This video will help you to understand what is happening to your child and will help prepare you for your medical visit.




Hand-foot-mouth disease or coxsackie is a common viral illness that most children get at some point that can cause symptoms including fever, rash, spots in the mouth and decreased feeding. This short video will help you to understand what to expect when your child has coxsackie and how you can care for them.




When children have a painful or anxiety provoking procedure such as straightening a broken arm, putting in stitches or performing invasive procedures, your child may need to have a procedural sedation. This video will help you learn the steps involved in a procedural sedation and will give you an idea of what to expect once you bring your child home.




When children have a painful or anxiety provoking procedure such as straightening a broken arm, putting in stitches or performing invasive procedures, your child may need to have a procedural sedation. This video will help you learn the steps involved in a procedural sedation and will give you an idea of what to expect once you bring your child home.




A febrile seizure is a convulsion accompanied by a fever or illness. The child usually has muscle twitching, jerking or stiffness for a few minutes. The child usually loses consciousness and it is common for the child’s eyes to roll upward. Most children are sleepy afterward and are not responsive to your voice. Febrile seizures are common. Between 2-5% of children will have at least one febrile seizure when they are between 6 months and 5 years old. This video will help you to understand what is happening to your child and will help prepare you for your medical visit.




Hand-foot-mouth disease or coxsackie is a common viral illness that most children get at some point that can cause symptoms including fever, rash, spots in the mouth and decreased feeding. This short video will help you to understand what to expect when your child has coxsackie and how you can care for them.




When children have a painful or anxiety provoking procedure such as straightening a broken arm, putting in stitches or performing invasive procedures, your child may need to have a procedural sedation. This video will help you learn the steps involved in a procedural sedation and will give you an idea of what to expect once you bring your child home.




When children have a painful or anxiety provoking procedure such as straightening a broken arm, putting in stitches or performing invasive procedures, your child may need to have a procedural sedation. This video will help you learn the steps involved in a procedural sedation and will give you an idea of what to expect once you bring your child home.




This infographic provides an overview of what chronic pain is, the healthcare providers that can help your child manage their pain, and tips on how to manage chronic pain in children, and where to find a chronic pain clinic in Canada.




The ECHO research program is focused on improving health outcomes for children with acute health conditions through the application of the best available evidence — a process known as knowledge translation (KT).




Acute otitis media (or middle ear infections)  are infections caused by viruses or bacteria, and are very common in children. This infographic provides useful information for parents and families with a child who has an ear infection. Browse through to learn about common symptoms, how to manage symptoms, and when to seek care.   This infographic was created through a collaboration between ECHO Research (University of Alberta), TREKK, and ARCHE (University of Alberta). Funding was provided by the Networks of Centres of Excellence and the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation through the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute.




Acute otitis media (or middle ear infections) are infections caused by viruses or bacteria and are very common in children. This video provides useful information for parents and families about symptoms, how to manage symptoms, and when to seek care for a child who has an ear infection. This video was created through a collaboration between ECHO Research (University of Alberta), TREKK, and ARCHE (University of Alberta). Funding was provided by the Networks of Centres of Excellence and the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation through the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute.




Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a bacterial infection of the urinary tract (kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra). They can occur at any stage of life and symptoms may be different depending on your child’s age. This video provides information about symptoms, when to seek medical care, and how to manage and prevent UTIs in children. This video was created through a collaboration between ECHO Research (University of Alberta), TREKK, and ARCHE (University of Alberta). Funding was provided by the Networks of Centres of Excellence and the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation through the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute.




Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a bacterial infection of the urinary tract (kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra). They can occur at any stage of life and symptoms may be different depending on your child’s age. This interactive infographic provides information about symptoms, when to seek medical care, and how to manage and prevent UTIs in children. This infographic was created through a collaboration between ECHO Research (University of Alberta), TREKK, and ARCHE (University of Alberta). Funding was provided by the Networks of Centres of Excellence and the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation through the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute.




To help parents interact constructively with their children during this time of confinement, the World Health Organization created these six one-page tips for parents cover planning one-on-one time, staying positive, creating a daily routine, avoiding bad behaviour, managing stress, and talking about COVID-19.     




Croup is a common respiratory illness caused by a viral infection in the airways. Accompanied by a barky cough and respiratory distress, this illness is most common in children from birth to 6 years of age, peaking at 2 years of age. This storybook is told through the eyes of parents and includes their experiences, health information, and recommendations for parents and families dealing with croup. This eBook was created by ECHO Research (University of Alberta) and ARCHE (University of Alberta) in collaboration with Alberta Health Services Edmonton Zone and the Stollery Children’s Hospital. Funding was provided by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).  




Croup is a common respiratory illness caused by a viral infection in the airways. Accompanied by a barky cough and respiratory distress, this illness is most common in children from birth to 6 years of age, peaking at 2 years of age. Browse through this interactive eBook for information on the signs, symptoms, treatment, and management of croup and what to do if you are a parent or family dealing with croup. This eBook was created through a collaboration between ECHO Research (University of Alberta), TREKK, and ARCHE (University of Alberta). Funding was provided by the Network of Centres of Excellence of Canada (NCE).




Croup is a common respiratory illness caused by a viral infection in the airways. Accompanied by a barky cough and respiratory distress, this illness is most common in children from birth to 6 years of age, peaking at 2 years of age. This is a short, animated video about signs and symptoms of croup, and what to do if you are a parent or a family dealing with a child who has croup. This video was created through a collaboration between ECHO Research (University of Alberta), TREKK, and ARCHE (University of Alberta). Funding was provided by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).




This eBook follows a teenager and her family's experiences dealing with chronic pain, sharing the struggle to achieve daily activities and how the family learned to cope with and manage her pain. This eBook and associated breathing exercises were created through a collaboration between ECHO Research (University of Alberta), the Stollery Children's Hospital Foundation, and the Women and Children's Health Research Institute. Funding was provided by the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation through the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute.




Gastroenteritis is an infection of the bowel (intestines) caused by a virus or bacteria that can cause diarrhea and vomiting. It is common in infants and children and can lead to dehydration. Browse through this eBook for information on the signs, symptoms, treatment, and management of gastroenteritis and what to do if you are a parent or family dealing with gastroenteritis. This eBook was created by ECHO Research (University of Alberta), ARCHE (University of Alberta), and TREKK. Funding was provided by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR). 




Needle pokes are one of the most common sources of pain for children seeking emergency medical care. Needle pokes may be used during healthcare visits to collect blood, deliver medication and fluids, or to numb certain body parts while stitching, for example. This interactive infographic provides useful age-specific tips for parents and families who have a child that may require a needle poke. This infographic was created through a collaboration between ECHO Research (University of Alberta), TREKK, and ARCHE (University of Alberta). Funding was provided by the Networks of Centres of Excellence and the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation through the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute.




Fevers are the body’s natural response to infection. It can be scary when your child has a fever, but fevers will not hurt your child. This infographic provides information about how to take your child’s temperature, how to manage their symptoms, and when to seek medical care. This infographic was created through a collaboration between ECHO Research (University of Alberta), TREKK, and ARCHE (University of Alberta). Funding was provided by the Networks of Centres of Excellence and the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation through the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute.




Bronchiolitis is a viral infection, commonly caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), that affects the lower part of the lungs. It mainly affects babies and young children under 2 and is very contagious. This eBook provides information on the symptoms of bronchiolitis, how to manage it at home, and when to seek emergency care. This eBook was created through a collaboration between ECHO Research (University of Alberta), TREKK, and ARCHE (University of Alberta). Funding was provided by the Networks of Centres of Excellence and the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation through the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute.




Looking for resources to understand the scientific realities of the COVID-19 virus and pandemic? Check out this children's science magazine, No Mercy for the Coronas, an engaging and accessible illustrated resource for kids (and parents!) to better understand viruses like COVID-19. This e-magazine was created by La Liberté and POP Comm, and developed with the participation of scientists and researchers at Children’s Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba (CHRIM), University of Manitoba and St. Boniface Hospital Albrechtsen Research Centre’s Youth BIOlab Jeunesse.No Mercy for the Coronas! is for all those who wish to offer children a scientifically reliable resource during this global health crisis affecting all ages and all aspects of society. You can read or download this free magazine in English or French.




RECOVER (Resources on Concussion in a Virtual Environment) was a study being conducted by researchers at Alberta Health Services, the University of Calgary and the University of Alberta. To improve outcomes for children with concussion who are seen in emergency departments, the study developed tools to help physicians and nurses provide better care and to help families to learn more about, assess, and monitor concussion.




Welcome to the HEAL (Health Education and Learning) program, a resource aimed at providing families across Alberta easily accessible, reliable information about common minor illness and injuries in children. The content provided in the HEAL program comes directly from the Pediatric Emergency Medicine experts at the Alberta Children’s Hospital and Stollery Children’s Hospital. While children with coughs, fever, ear pain, vomiting, diarrhea, minor head injuries or nosebleeds can feel very uncomfortable, they are most often safely and best cared for in their own home; the majority of these illnesses and injuries do not require a visit to the Emergency Department.




Being the parent of a child with life-threatening food allergies can be challenging. Visit the Children's Allergy and Asthma Education Resource Centre to view a series of videos that provide parent's views on life with a food allergy (accessed online: March 2017).




Prepared by the Pediatric Section of the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians (CAEP) and the National Emergency Nurses Association (NENA), this resource highlights 10 tips to keep families safe and prepared for an emergency.




PLAN D'ACTION CANADIEN POUR L1ANAPHYLAXIE POUR LES ENFANTS- French




Bronchiolitis is a viral infection, commonly caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), that affects the lower part of the lungs. It mainly affects babies and young children under 2 and is very contagious. This infographic provides information on the symptoms of bronchiolitis, how to manage it at home, and when to seek emergency care. This infographic was created through a collaboration between ECHO Research (University of Alberta), TREKK, and ARCHE (University of Alberta). Funding was provided by the Networks of Centres of Excellence and the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation through the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute.




Croup is a common respiratory illness caused by a viral infection in the airways. Accompanied by a barky cough and respiratory distress, this illness is most common in children from birth to 6 years of age, peaking at 2 years of age. This storybook is told through the eyes of parents and includes their experiences, health information, and recommendations for parents and families dealing with croup. This eBook was created by ECHO Research (University of Alberta) and ARCHE (University of Alberta) in collaboration with Alberta Health Services Edmonton Zone and the Stollery Children’s Hospital. Funding was provided by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).  




Parachute is a Canadian, charitable organization dedicated to preventing injuries and saving lives. Their focus is on prevention, specifically related to motor vehicle collisions, sports and recreation and seniors' falls.