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Key studies English (32) French All (32)

Parents' concerns and beliefs about temperature measurement in children: a qualitative study

Visit

Morris E, Glogowska M, Ismail FA, Edwards G, Fleming S, Wang K, et al.

Nearly 40% of parents with children aged 6 to 17 months consult a healthcare professional when their child has a high temperature. Clinical guidelines recommend temperature measurement in these children, but little is known about parents' experiences of and beliefs about temperature measurement. This study aimed to explore parents' concerns and beliefs about temperature measurement in children.

Management of fever in Australian children: a population-based sample survey

Visit

Holt J, White L, Wheaton GR, Williams H, Jani S, Arnolda G, et al

Fever in childhood is a common acute presentation requiring clinical triage to identify the few children who have serious underlying infection. Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have been developed to assist clinicians with this task. This study aimed to assess the proportion of care provided in accordance with CPG recommendations for the management of fever in Australian children.

Randomised controlled trial of an intervention to improve parental knowledge and management practices of fever.

Visit

Kelly M, Sahm L, McCarthy S, O'Sullivan R, Mc Gillicuddy A, Shiely F.

We know that parents require resources which can assist them to improve fever knowledge and management practices. The purpose of this study, using an RCT, was to examine the effectiveness of an information leaflet at increasing parental knowledge of fever, specifically temperature definition.

Parental Approach to the Management of Childhood Fever: Differences between Health Professional and Non-Health Professional Parents.

Visit

Villarejo-Rodrguez MG, Rodrguez-Martn B.

Fever is responsible for 30% of pediatric consultations at primary care services. The aim of this study was to explore the parental approach to fever in children aged between 0 and 12 years old by both health professional and non-health professional parents. A qualitative study based on grounded theory was performed. Focus groups were conducted, segmented by sex, place of residence, and healthcare training, using a triangulated sample (theoretical and snowball sampling) of parents of children aged between 0 and 12 years who were treated for fever at primary care emergency services. The constant comparative method and a process of coding was used for the analysis. The study findings reveal that the health training of parents, their former experience, family pressures, the age of the child, and the parents' work outside the home, all influenced how they approached fever management. These findings could be incorporated into clinical practice to improve care and compliance with fever treatment.

Key Study: Point-of-care C reactive protein to identify serious infection in acutely ill children presenting to hospital: prospective cohort study

Visit

Verbakel JY, Lemiengre MB, De Burghgraeve T, De Sutter A, Aertgeerts B, Bulle...

This prospective study aimed to develop improved tools to assess children attending ambulatory hospital care, integrating clinical features with point-of-care C reactive protein (CRP).

Key Study: Clinical prediction models for young febrile infants at the emergency department: an international validation study

Visit

Vos-Kerkhof E, Gomez B, Milcent K, Steyerberg EW, Nijman RG, Smit FJ, Mintegi...

The objective of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of existing clinical prediction models in febrile young infants at risk for serious bacterial infections.

Key Study: Accuracy of Complete Blood Cell Counts to Identify Febrile Infants 60 Days or Younger With Invasive Bacterial Infections

Visit

Cruz AT, Mahajan P, Bonsu BK, Bennett JE, Levine DA, Alpern ER, Nigrovic LE, ...

The objective of this study was to estimate the accuracy of individual complete blood cell count parameters to identify febrile infants with invasive bacterial infections.

Key Study: Clinical Pathway Effectiveness: Febrile Young Infant Clinical Pathway in a Pediatric Emergency Department

Visit

Murray AL, Alpern E, Lavelle J, Mollen C

The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of a febrile young infant clinical pathway implemented in a large, urban children's hospital ED on the timeliness and consistency of care.

Key Study: The Yale Observation Scale Score and the Risk of Serious Bacterial Infections in Febrile Infants

Visit

Nigrovic LE, Mahajan PV, Blumberg SM, Browne LR, Linakis JG, Ruddy RM, Bennet...

The objectives of this study were to assess the performance of the Yale Observation Scale score and unstructured clinician suspicion to identify febrile infants 60 days of age with and without serious bacterial infections.

Key Study: Lumbar Puncture for All Febrile Infants 29-56 Days Old: A Retrospective Cohort Reassessment Study

Visit

Scarfone R, Murray A, Gala P, Balamuth F

The objectives of this study were to determine the incidence of bacterial meningitis among all febrile infants 29-56 days old undergoing a lumbar puncture in the emergency department of a tertiary care children's hospital and the number of low-risk febrile infants with bacterial meningitis to reassess the need for routine lumbar puncture in these infants.

Key Study: Prevalence of Concomitant Acute Bacterial Meningitis in Neonates with Febrile Urinary Tract Infection: A Retrospective Cross-Sectional Study

Visit

Wallace SS, Brown DN, Cruz AT

The objective of this study was to describe the frequency of concomitant acute bacterial meningitis in neonates with febrile urinary tract infection.

Alternating Acetaminophen and Ibuprofen versus Monotherapies in Improvements of Distress and Reducing Refractory Fever in Febrile Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Visit

Luo S, Ran M, Luo Q, Shu M, Guo Q, Zhu Y, et al

Our objective was to assess the effect of alternating acetaminophen and ibuprofen therapy on distress and refractory fever compared with acetaminophen or ibuprofen as monotherapy in febrile children.

Key Study: Initial Presentation of Neonatal Herpes Simplex Virus Infection

Visit

Curfman AL, Glissmeyer EW, Ahmad FA, Korgenski EK, Blaschke AJ, Byington CL, ...

The objective of this study was to inform the decision to test and empirically treat for herpes simplex virus (HSV) by describing the initial clinical presentation and laboratory findings of infants with a confirmed diagnosis of neonatal HSV.

Key Study: Lack of Accuracy of Biomarkers and Physical Examination to Detect Bacterial Infection in Febrile Infants

Visit

Daz MG, Garca RP, Gamero DB, Gonzlez-Tom MI, Romero PC, Ferrer MM, Contreras JR

The aim of this study was to analyze the usefulness of physical examination, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, white blood cell count, and absolute neutrophils counts for the diagnosis of invasive bacterial infections and potentially serious bacterial infections in infants younger than the age of 3 months presenting with fever without source to the emergency department.

Key Study: Validation of the "Step-by-Step" Approach in the Management of Young Febrile Infants

Visit

Gomez B, Mintegi S, Bressan S, Da Dalt L, Gervaix A, Lacroix L; European Grou...

The aim of this study was to prospectively validate a sequential approach to young febrile infants on the basis of clinical and laboratory parameters, and compare it with the Rochester criteria and the Lab-score.

Key Study: Use of Procalcitonin Assays to Predict Serious Bacterial Infection in Young Febrile Infants

Visit

Milcent K, Faesch S, Gras-Le Guen C, Dubos F, Poulalhon C, Badier I, Marc E, ...

The objective of this study was to assess the diagnostic characteristics of the procalcitonin assay for detecting serious bacterial infection and invasive bacterial infection in febrile infants aged 7 to 91 days.

Translation of clinical prediction rules for febrile children to primary care practice: an observational cohort study

Visit

van Ierland Y, Elshout G, Berger MY, Vergouwe Y, de Wilde M, van der Lei J, e...

To evaluate the diagnostic value of published CPRs for febrile children in primary care.

Predicting prolonged duration of fever in children: a cohort study in primary care

Visit

Elshout G, Kool M, Bohnen AM, Koes BW, Moll HA, Berger MY.

To determine which signs and symptoms predict a prolonged duration of fever in febrile children in primary care and evaluate whether C-reactive protein (CRP) measurement has an additive predictive value for these symptoms.

Key Study: Value of white cell count in predicting serious bacterial infection in febrile children under 5 years of age

Visit

De S, Williams GJ, Hayen A, Macaskill P, McCaskill M, Isaacs D, Craig JC

The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of leukocyte count for the detection of serious bacterial infections in febrile children.

Key Study: The changing epidemiology of serious bacterial infections in young infants

Visit

Greenhow TL, Hung YY, Herz AM, Losada E, Pantell RH

This study analyzed all cultures of blood, urine and cerebrospinal fluid obtained from full-term infants 1 week to 3 months of age, who presented during a 7-year period. Compared with earlier studies, urinary tract infections (UTIs) are now found significantly more often than bacteremia and meningitis with 92% of occult infections associated with UTIs. These data emphasize the importance of an urinalysis in febrile infants.

Duration of fever and course of symptoms in young febrile children presenting with uncomplicated illness

Visit

Kool M, Elshout G, Moll HA, Koes BW, van der Wouden JC, Berger MY.

It is important to advise parents when to consult a doctor when their child has fever. To provide evidence-based, safety-net advice for young febrile children, we studied the risk of complications, the occurrence of alarm symptoms, the duration of fever.

Key Study: Predicting severe bacterial infections in well-appearing febrile neonates: laboratory markers accuracy and duration of fever

Visit

Bressan S, Andreola B, Cattelan F, Zangardi T, Perilongo G, Da Dalt L

The objective of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of white blood cell count, absolute neutrophil count, and C-reactive protein in detecting severe bacterial infections in well-appearing neonates with early onset fever without source and in relation to fever duration.

Key Study: Blood culture and bacteremia predictors in infants less than three months of age with fever without source

Visit

Gmez B, Mintegi S, Benito J, Egireun A, Garcia D, Astobiza E

The objectives of this study were (1) to assess the rate of bacteremia in febrile infants less than 3 months of age admitted to a pediatric emergency department at a tertiary hospital; (2) to describe the bacteria isolated; and (3) to analyze factors related to increased probability of having a positive blood culture.

Key Study: C-reactive protein as a marker of serious bacterial infections in hospitalized febrile infants

Visit

Bilavsky E, Yarden-Bilavsky H, Ashkenazi S, Amir J

The objective of this study was to determine the potential predictive power of C-reactive protein as a marker of serious bacterial infection in hospitalized febrile infants aged < or =3 months.

Key Study: Clinical and laboratory features of neonatal herpes simplex virus infection: a case-control study

Visit

Caviness AC, Demmler GJ, Selwyn BJ

The objective of this study was to determine the unique clinical and laboratory features of neonates with and without herpes simplex virus infection admitted to Texas Children's Hospital during a 14-year period.

Short-term outcomes of pediatric emergency department febrile illnesses.

Visit

Mistry RD, Stevens MW, Gorelick MH.

To describe short-term outcomes relevant to children and their caregivers after evaluation in the emergency department (ED) for febrile illnesses.

Comparing different patterns for managing febrile children in the ED between emergency and pediatric physicians: impact on patient outcome.

Visit

Seow VK, Lin AC, Lin IY, Chen CC, Chen KC, Wang TL, Chong CF.

The management of children with fever of indefinite source still remains controversial. This study aimed to compare different practice patterns between pediatric physicians (PPs) and emergency physicians (EPs) in the management of pediatric fever in the emergency department (ED) and correlate them to existing practice guidelines. Their impact on patient outcomes was also discussed.

Antipyretic treatment in young children with fever: acetaminophen, ibuprofen, or both alternating in a randomized, double-blind study

Visit

Sarrell EM, Wielunsky E, Cohen HA.

To compare the antipyretic benefit of acetaminophen or ibuprofen monotherapy with an alternating regimen of both drugs in young children aged 6 to 36 months.

Prospective evaluation of the risk of serious bacterial infection in children who present to the emergency department with hyperpyrexia (temperature of 106 degrees F or higher).

Visit

Trautner BW, Caviness AC, Gerlacher GR, Demmler G, Macias CG.

The purpose of this study was to determine (1) the risk of serious bacterial infection in children with hyperpyrexia and (2) whether clinical presentation can identify hyperpyrexic patients at risk for serious bacterial infection.

Parental and health care provider understanding of childhood fever: a Canadian perspective.

Visit

Karwowska A, Nijssen-Jordan C, Johnson D, Davies HD.

Fever is common in children and causes misconceptions among parents. Many investigators have called for improved parental education to dispel "fever phobia." Our objectives were to assess parental and health care provider understanding of fever, its treatment, and beliefs about its consequences, as well as to identify parental sources of information about fever.

Pediatric emergency department nurses' perspectives on fever in children.

Visit

Poirier MP, Davis PH, Gonzalez-del Rey JA, Monroe KW.

Fever is the most common complaint of children seen in a Pediatric Emergency Department (PED). Since pediatric emergency nurses commonly educate parents on fever management, this study sought to examine their knowledge base regarding fever in children.

Key Study: The effects of bundling on infant temperature

Visit

Grover G, Berkowitz CD, Lewis RJ, Thompson M, Berry L, Seidel J

The objective of this study was to determine whether bundling elevates rectal and/or skin temperature of young infants.

Parents' concerns and beliefs about temperature measurement in children: a qualitative study

Visit

Morris E, Glogowska M, Ismail FA, Edwards G, Fleming S, Wang K, et al.

Nearly 40% of parents with children aged 6 to 17 months consult a healthcare professional when their child has a high temperature. Clinical guidelines recommend temperature measurement in these children, but little is known about parents' experiences of and beliefs about temperature measurement. This study aimed to explore parents' concerns and beliefs about temperature measurement in children.

Management of fever in Australian children: a population-based sample survey

Visit

Holt J, White L, Wheaton GR, Williams H, Jani S, Arnolda G, et al

Fever in childhood is a common acute presentation requiring clinical triage to identify the few children who have serious underlying infection. Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have been developed to assist clinicians with this task. This study aimed to assess the proportion of care provided in accordance with CPG recommendations for the management of fever in Australian children.

Randomised controlled trial of an intervention to improve parental knowledge and management practices of fever.

Visit

Kelly M, Sahm L, McCarthy S, O'Sullivan R, Mc Gillicuddy A, Shiely F.

We know that parents require resources which can assist them to improve fever knowledge and management practices. The purpose of this study, using an RCT, was to examine the effectiveness of an information leaflet at increasing parental knowledge of fever, specifically temperature definition.

Parental Approach to the Management of Childhood Fever: Differences between Health Professional and Non-Health Professional Parents.

Visit

Villarejo-Rodrguez MG, Rodrguez-Martn B.

Fever is responsible for 30% of pediatric consultations at primary care services. The aim of this study was to explore the parental approach to fever in children aged between 0 and 12 years old by both health professional and non-health professional parents. A qualitative study based on grounded theory was performed. Focus groups were conducted, segmented by sex, place of residence, and healthcare training, using a triangulated sample (theoretical and snowball sampling) of parents of children aged between 0 and 12 years who were treated for fever at primary care emergency services. The constant comparative method and a process of coding was used for the analysis. The study findings reveal that the health training of parents, their former experience, family pressures, the age of the child, and the parents' work outside the home, all influenced how they approached fever management. These findings could be incorporated into clinical practice to improve care and compliance with fever treatment.

Key Study: Point-of-care C reactive protein to identify serious infection in acutely ill children presenting to hospital: prospective cohort study

Visit

Verbakel JY, Lemiengre MB, De Burghgraeve T, De Sutter A, Aertgeerts B, Bulle...

This prospective study aimed to develop improved tools to assess children attending ambulatory hospital care, integrating clinical features with point-of-care C reactive protein (CRP).

Key Study: Clinical prediction models for young febrile infants at the emergency department: an international validation study

Visit

Vos-Kerkhof E, Gomez B, Milcent K, Steyerberg EW, Nijman RG, Smit FJ, Mintegi...

The objective of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of existing clinical prediction models in febrile young infants at risk for serious bacterial infections.

Key Study: Accuracy of Complete Blood Cell Counts to Identify Febrile Infants 60 Days or Younger With Invasive Bacterial Infections

Visit

Cruz AT, Mahajan P, Bonsu BK, Bennett JE, Levine DA, Alpern ER, Nigrovic LE, ...

The objective of this study was to estimate the accuracy of individual complete blood cell count parameters to identify febrile infants with invasive bacterial infections.

Key Study: Clinical Pathway Effectiveness: Febrile Young Infant Clinical Pathway in a Pediatric Emergency Department

Visit

Murray AL, Alpern E, Lavelle J, Mollen C

The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of a febrile young infant clinical pathway implemented in a large, urban children's hospital ED on the timeliness and consistency of care.

Key Study: The Yale Observation Scale Score and the Risk of Serious Bacterial Infections in Febrile Infants

Visit

Nigrovic LE, Mahajan PV, Blumberg SM, Browne LR, Linakis JG, Ruddy RM, Bennet...

The objectives of this study were to assess the performance of the Yale Observation Scale score and unstructured clinician suspicion to identify febrile infants 60 days of age with and without serious bacterial infections.

Key Study: Lumbar Puncture for All Febrile Infants 29-56 Days Old: A Retrospective Cohort Reassessment Study

Visit

Scarfone R, Murray A, Gala P, Balamuth F

The objectives of this study were to determine the incidence of bacterial meningitis among all febrile infants 29-56 days old undergoing a lumbar puncture in the emergency department of a tertiary care children's hospital and the number of low-risk febrile infants with bacterial meningitis to reassess the need for routine lumbar puncture in these infants.

Key Study: Prevalence of Concomitant Acute Bacterial Meningitis in Neonates with Febrile Urinary Tract Infection: A Retrospective Cross-Sectional Study

Visit

Wallace SS, Brown DN, Cruz AT

The objective of this study was to describe the frequency of concomitant acute bacterial meningitis in neonates with febrile urinary tract infection.

Alternating Acetaminophen and Ibuprofen versus Monotherapies in Improvements of Distress and Reducing Refractory Fever in Febrile Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Visit

Luo S, Ran M, Luo Q, Shu M, Guo Q, Zhu Y, et al

Our objective was to assess the effect of alternating acetaminophen and ibuprofen therapy on distress and refractory fever compared with acetaminophen or ibuprofen as monotherapy in febrile children.

Key Study: Initial Presentation of Neonatal Herpes Simplex Virus Infection

Visit

Curfman AL, Glissmeyer EW, Ahmad FA, Korgenski EK, Blaschke AJ, Byington CL, ...

The objective of this study was to inform the decision to test and empirically treat for herpes simplex virus (HSV) by describing the initial clinical presentation and laboratory findings of infants with a confirmed diagnosis of neonatal HSV.

Key Study: Lack of Accuracy of Biomarkers and Physical Examination to Detect Bacterial Infection in Febrile Infants

Visit

Daz MG, Garca RP, Gamero DB, Gonzlez-Tom MI, Romero PC, Ferrer MM, Contreras JR

The aim of this study was to analyze the usefulness of physical examination, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, white blood cell count, and absolute neutrophils counts for the diagnosis of invasive bacterial infections and potentially serious bacterial infections in infants younger than the age of 3 months presenting with fever without source to the emergency department.

Key Study: Validation of the "Step-by-Step" Approach in the Management of Young Febrile Infants

Visit

Gomez B, Mintegi S, Bressan S, Da Dalt L, Gervaix A, Lacroix L; European Grou...

The aim of this study was to prospectively validate a sequential approach to young febrile infants on the basis of clinical and laboratory parameters, and compare it with the Rochester criteria and the Lab-score.

Key Study: Use of Procalcitonin Assays to Predict Serious Bacterial Infection in Young Febrile Infants

Visit

Milcent K, Faesch S, Gras-Le Guen C, Dubos F, Poulalhon C, Badier I, Marc E, ...

The objective of this study was to assess the diagnostic characteristics of the procalcitonin assay for detecting serious bacterial infection and invasive bacterial infection in febrile infants aged 7 to 91 days.

Translation of clinical prediction rules for febrile children to primary care practice: an observational cohort study

Visit

van Ierland Y, Elshout G, Berger MY, Vergouwe Y, de Wilde M, van der Lei J, e...

To evaluate the diagnostic value of published CPRs for febrile children in primary care.

Predicting prolonged duration of fever in children: a cohort study in primary care

Visit

Elshout G, Kool M, Bohnen AM, Koes BW, Moll HA, Berger MY.

To determine which signs and symptoms predict a prolonged duration of fever in febrile children in primary care and evaluate whether C-reactive protein (CRP) measurement has an additive predictive value for these symptoms.

Key Study: Value of white cell count in predicting serious bacterial infection in febrile children under 5 years of age

Visit

De S, Williams GJ, Hayen A, Macaskill P, McCaskill M, Isaacs D, Craig JC

The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of leukocyte count for the detection of serious bacterial infections in febrile children.

Key Study: The changing epidemiology of serious bacterial infections in young infants

Visit

Greenhow TL, Hung YY, Herz AM, Losada E, Pantell RH

This study analyzed all cultures of blood, urine and cerebrospinal fluid obtained from full-term infants 1 week to 3 months of age, who presented during a 7-year period. Compared with earlier studies, urinary tract infections (UTIs) are now found significantly more often than bacteremia and meningitis with 92% of occult infections associated with UTIs. These data emphasize the importance of an urinalysis in febrile infants.

Duration of fever and course of symptoms in young febrile children presenting with uncomplicated illness

Visit

Kool M, Elshout G, Moll HA, Koes BW, van der Wouden JC, Berger MY.

It is important to advise parents when to consult a doctor when their child has fever. To provide evidence-based, safety-net advice for young febrile children, we studied the risk of complications, the occurrence of alarm symptoms, the duration of fever.

Key Study: Predicting severe bacterial infections in well-appearing febrile neonates: laboratory markers accuracy and duration of fever

Visit

Bressan S, Andreola B, Cattelan F, Zangardi T, Perilongo G, Da Dalt L

The objective of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of white blood cell count, absolute neutrophil count, and C-reactive protein in detecting severe bacterial infections in well-appearing neonates with early onset fever without source and in relation to fever duration.

Key Study: Blood culture and bacteremia predictors in infants less than three months of age with fever without source

Visit

Gmez B, Mintegi S, Benito J, Egireun A, Garcia D, Astobiza E

The objectives of this study were (1) to assess the rate of bacteremia in febrile infants less than 3 months of age admitted to a pediatric emergency department at a tertiary hospital; (2) to describe the bacteria isolated; and (3) to analyze factors related to increased probability of having a positive blood culture.

Key Study: C-reactive protein as a marker of serious bacterial infections in hospitalized febrile infants

Visit

Bilavsky E, Yarden-Bilavsky H, Ashkenazi S, Amir J

The objective of this study was to determine the potential predictive power of C-reactive protein as a marker of serious bacterial infection in hospitalized febrile infants aged < or =3 months.

Key Study: Clinical and laboratory features of neonatal herpes simplex virus infection: a case-control study

Visit

Caviness AC, Demmler GJ, Selwyn BJ

The objective of this study was to determine the unique clinical and laboratory features of neonates with and without herpes simplex virus infection admitted to Texas Children's Hospital during a 14-year period.

Short-term outcomes of pediatric emergency department febrile illnesses.

Visit

Mistry RD, Stevens MW, Gorelick MH.

To describe short-term outcomes relevant to children and their caregivers after evaluation in the emergency department (ED) for febrile illnesses.

Comparing different patterns for managing febrile children in the ED between emergency and pediatric physicians: impact on patient outcome.

Visit

Seow VK, Lin AC, Lin IY, Chen CC, Chen KC, Wang TL, Chong CF.

The management of children with fever of indefinite source still remains controversial. This study aimed to compare different practice patterns between pediatric physicians (PPs) and emergency physicians (EPs) in the management of pediatric fever in the emergency department (ED) and correlate them to existing practice guidelines. Their impact on patient outcomes was also discussed.

Antipyretic treatment in young children with fever: acetaminophen, ibuprofen, or both alternating in a randomized, double-blind study

Visit

Sarrell EM, Wielunsky E, Cohen HA.

To compare the antipyretic benefit of acetaminophen or ibuprofen monotherapy with an alternating regimen of both drugs in young children aged 6 to 36 months.

Prospective evaluation of the risk of serious bacterial infection in children who present to the emergency department with hyperpyrexia (temperature of 106 degrees F or higher).

Visit

Trautner BW, Caviness AC, Gerlacher GR, Demmler G, Macias CG.

The purpose of this study was to determine (1) the risk of serious bacterial infection in children with hyperpyrexia and (2) whether clinical presentation can identify hyperpyrexic patients at risk for serious bacterial infection.

Parental and health care provider understanding of childhood fever: a Canadian perspective.

Visit

Karwowska A, Nijssen-Jordan C, Johnson D, Davies HD.

Fever is common in children and causes misconceptions among parents. Many investigators have called for improved parental education to dispel "fever phobia." Our objectives were to assess parental and health care provider understanding of fever, its treatment, and beliefs about its consequences, as well as to identify parental sources of information about fever.

Pediatric emergency department nurses' perspectives on fever in children.

Visit

Poirier MP, Davis PH, Gonzalez-del Rey JA, Monroe KW.

Fever is the most common complaint of children seen in a Pediatric Emergency Department (PED). Since pediatric emergency nurses commonly educate parents on fever management, this study sought to examine their knowledge base regarding fever in children.

Key Study: The effects of bundling on infant temperature

Visit

Grover G, Berkowitz CD, Lewis RJ, Thompson M, Berry L, Seidel J

The objective of this study was to determine whether bundling elevates rectal and/or skin temperature of young infants.

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