Logo
[img]

Blog: Reaching Far and Wide- TREKK in the North 

<< back to News and Events
All TREKK.ca Blogs
Posted on July 08, 2021

twitter icon facebook icon



Reaching Far and Wide: TREKK in the North

With the goal of providing every child with the highest standard of emergency care, TREKK has been reaching far and wide to accomplish that. Many rural and remote hospitals, nursing stations and health centers have been using our evidence-based resources and tools to better the care provided to the children they treat. This includes physicians and other healthcare staff in remote, northern communities. 

In the small Hamlet of Baker Laker Nunavut, Dr. Lanice Jones is one of the community’s rotating physiciansWith a background in rural, remote and tropical medicine Dr. Jones is well versed in handling emergency situations and has still found the TREKK resources helpful when it comes to providing quality emergency care for kids.

 

“While we have territorial guidelines, TREKK's algorithms are precise, stepwise, easy to read and follow.  I feel that the work has been done for me, to provide me with the best possible care under critical incidents.” says Dr. Jones.

 

She and her team have regular contact with the physicians at the HSC Children’s Hospital in Winnipeg, which includes Dr. Darcy Beer, Pediatric Emergency physician and TREKK lead for Manitoba.  

 

“I feel that TREKK resources are particularly important in remote areas where rapid access to speciality services is limited. An acutely ill child may have to be managed by a small team of nurses, often with no on-site physician for many hours. Current, user friendly, quick access tools through TREKK.ca or the TREKK app can make a significant difference in these cases.”

 

Keeping herself and her team up to date on the latest pediatric evidence is top of mind for Dr. Jones. Being in the far North, at times Dr. Jones has had to get creative when it comes to practicing pediatric preparedness. She says they use whatever materials they have on hand to practice their skills.

 

                                                                       Dr. Jones

“One of our Inuit healthcare staff donated caribou fibula bones, and our building maintenance manager had donated silicone caulking material, which, with dish-soap makes a decent fake-flesh covering, and we set aside time to discuss and practice inserting IO needles, and the TREKK protocol.”

 

TREKK is proud to provide education, tools and resources to all healthcare professionals, whether they’re working in a pediatric center, general emergency room or as far North as Nunavut and beyond.

To view our resources, click here. 

 

 

 



Documents and Photos